Start Including Dads in Olympics Ads

You’ve most likely noticed Procter & Gamble's Olympic advertising campaign: "Thank You, Mom" Only mom? We agree Mom deserves praise and is an integral part of a team in raising a child. But what about Dad? P&G’s ad campaign completely excludes fathers from the parenting equation and we’re disappointed!

P& G’s Tagline: “The hardest job in the world is the best job in the world.”

                           Proctor & Gamble. PROUD SPONSOR OF MOMS.


Where are the fathers? We believe this campaign does a disservice to fathers—and mothers! Dads can be—and are—just as nurturing, capable, and confident as moms. We aren’t just mommy’s little helper; we’re equal partners in a child-rearing, parenting team. As our friend Kristin Maschka points out, "The flip side of implying that mothers are responsible for raising children and naturally better at it, is that fathers don’t share responsibility, and aren’t very good at it.”

It’s hard for us to believe there aren’t any fathers in these athletes’ lives who didn’t make sacrifices so their children could pursue their Olympic dreams. In fact, research shows that dads play the primary role in sparking an interest and in physical practice. Dads also drive the kids to practice, coach their teams, make dinners, and do everything else parents do.

P&G acknowledges what moms do (and they do a lot!). So why leave dads out?

Is P&G assuming dads don’t buy Charmin, Duracell, Pampers, and Tide? 21st Century dads are involved at every stage of our children’s lives. Excluding us as parents is insulting (plus it furthers the stereotype that parenting is really women’s work—something most 21st Century moms would disagree with). And considering that dads are doing a growing amount of the household shopping, ignoring us may not be the best marketing strategy. How about being more inclusive of fathers: "Thank you, Mom and Dad" or "Thank you, Parents"?

Please join us in urging P&G to start including dads in their advertising, to celebrate the wonderful things dads do, and to acknowledge that dads are doing the hardest jobs in the world together with their wives and partners.

Special thanks to Kristin Maschka, Nancy Dickinson, Daddy's in Charge, Al & Chad of Daddyshome, Inc., Dad & Buried, Sam Have Sippy, GreatDad.com, MrDad.com, and Bruce Sallan for inspiring us to get involved with this petition!


Dear P&G.



Hundreds of millions of people have seen your London Olympic games advertising campaign: "Thank You, Mom" Only mom? We agree Mom deserves praise and is an integral part of a team in raising a child. But what about Dad? Your campaign completely excludes fathers from the parenting equation and we’re disappointed!



“The hardest job in the world is the best job in the world.”



                           Proctor & Gamble. PROUD SPONSOR OF MOMS.



Where are the fathers? We believe this campaign does a disservice to fathers—and mothers! Dads can be—and are—just as nurturing, capable, and confident as moms. We aren’t just mommy’s little helper; we’re equal partners in a child-rearing, parenting team. As our friend Kristin Maschka points out, "The flip side of implying that mothers are responsible for raising children and naturally better at it, is that fathers don’t share responsibility, and aren’t very good at it.”



It’s hard for us to believe there aren’t any fathers in these athletes’ lives who didn’t make sacrifices so their children could pursue their Olympic dreams. In fact, research shows that dads play the primary role in sparking an interest and in physical practice. Dads also drive the kids to practice, coach their teams, make dinners, and do everything else parents do.



Your company what moms do (and they do a lot!). So why leave dads out?



Is P&G assuming dads don’t buy Charmin, Duracell, Pampers, and Tide? 21st Century dads are involved at every stage of our children’s lives. Excluding us as parents is insulting (plus it furthers the stereotype that parenting is really women’s work—something most 21st Century moms would disagree with). And considering that dads are doing a growing amount of the household shopping, ignoring us may not be the best marketing strategy. How about being more inclusive of fathers: "Thank you, Mom and Dad" or "Thank you, Parents"?



We respectfully request that you start including dads in your advertising to celebrate the wonderful things dads do and to acknowledge that dads are doing the hardest jobs in the world together with their wives and partners.

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