Ban Dissection in Schools and Universities

  • by: Animal Advocates
  • target: United States Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Environmental Protection Agency Deputy Administrator Robert Perciasepe

Each year, 20 million animals are dissected or vivisected in schools and universities. It is estimated that 170 animal species or more are used for dissection and vivisection. The most commonly dissected vertebrates are frogs, fetal pigs, and cats. Others include dogfish sharks, perch, rats, pigeons, salamanders, rabbits, mice, turtles, snakes, mink, foxes, and bats.

Many are taken from the wild,-and the removal of animals from their natural habitats for use in classrooms can disrupt the ecosystem and sets a negative example for wildlife conservation and environmental protection- two vital concepts for future scientists. Others come from animal breeders and dealers, animal shelters, pet stores, fur farms, and slaughterhouses- and many illegal sources.

While most of the animals used in schools and universities are purchased as dead specimens, many are subjected to painful and lethal procedures while still alive. Frogs, for instance, may be piled into bags for days or even weeks while still alive. Rats may be embalmed alive. Cats may be forcibly injected with preserving fluids after being only partially euthanized, thrown into gas chambers, or drowned.

Chemicals used to preserve dead specimens; such as formaldehyde and formalin (diluted form of formaldehyde) are respiratory irritants, carcinogenic in humans, and environmental pollutants. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this chemical preservative can be linked to cancer of the throat, lungs, and nasal passages. Those exposed to formaldehyde risk damage to the eyes, skin irritation, bronchitis, and asthma attacks. Children may be more susceptible to the respiratory effects of formaldehyde than adults, according to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR).

We ask the United States Department of Education, and the Environment Protection Agency to move toward a ban of school dissection- it is animal cruelty which poses toxic threats to both humans and the environment, while disrupting ecosystems. This practice is outdated with many advanced, safe alternatives.

SOURCE:http://lcanimal.org/index.php/campaigns/other-issues/dissection

Each year, 20 million animals are dissected or vivisected in schools and universities. It is estimated that 170 animal species or more are used for dissection and vivisection. The most commonly dissected vertebrates are frogs, fetal pigs, and cats. Others include dogfish sharks, perch, rats, pigeons, salamanders, rabbits, mice, turtles, snakes, mink, foxes, and bats.


Many are taken from the wild,-and the removal of animals from their natural habitats for use in classrooms can disrupt the ecosystem and sets a negative example for wildlife conservation and environmental protection- two vital concepts for future scientists. Others come from animal breeders and dealers, animal shelters, pet stores, fur farms, and slaughterhouses- and many illegal sources.


While most of the animals used in schools and universities are purchased as dead specimens, many are subjected to painful and lethal procedures while still alive. Frogs, for instance, may be piled into bags for days or even weeks while still alive. Rats may be embalmed alive. Cats may be forcibly injected with preserving fluids after being only partially euthanized, thrown into gas chambers, or drowned.


Chemicals used to preserve dead specimens; such as formaldehyde and formalin (diluted form of formaldehyde) are respiratory irritants, carcinogenic in humans, and environmental pollutants. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this chemical preservative can be linked to cancer of the throat, lungs, and nasal passages. Those exposed to formaldehyde risk damage to the eyes, skin irritation, bronchitis, and asthma attacks. Children may be more susceptible to the respiratory effects of formaldehyde than adults, according to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR).


We ask the United States Department of Education, and the Environment Protection Agency to move toward a ban of school dissection- it is animal cruelty which poses toxic threats to both humans and the environment, while disrupting ecosystems. This practice is outdated with many advanced, safe alternatives.

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