Brazil: Protect Children from Sex Trafficking During World Cup!

  • By: Kristi Arnold
  • Target: Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and Vice President Michel Temer

More than half a million football fans will be in Brazil during this year's World Cup. But there are major concerns about child sex trafficking in Brazil during the upcoming event. The Brazilian government must do more to protect children.

"You can go online and see $12,000, $10,000 for the flight, the hotel, the game - and the girl," Diego Traverso, Latin America anti-trafficking programs manager for Operation Blessing, told CBN News.

A documentary from Operation Blessing set to release just before the games may help curb sex trafficking, its creators hope. 

"We're trying to raise the stigma against this and educate the people coming in for the World Cup that this isn't just a service you can buy without consequences, that these are children trapped in a hell," David Darg, vice president of International Operations for Operation Blessing, said. "We see kids, talking 12 or 11 if you haven't lost your virginity at 11 you're wrong--something's wrong with you. I see many, many cases of mothers selling their daughters like to neighbors, on the street, taking them to the street, teaching them kind of the business, to survive."

Tell Brazilian government to air the Operation Blessing documentary on national television and do more to protect children from sex trafficking within its borders.

Dear Madam and Sir,


We the undersigned ask that you protect your children and young women from sex trafficking.


More than half a million football fans will be in Brazil during this year's World Cup. But there are major concerns about child sex trafficking in Brazil during the upcoming event. The Brazilian government must do more to protect children.


"You can go online and see $12,000, $10,000 for the flight, the hotel, the game - and the girl," Diego Traverso, Latin America anti-trafficking programs manager for Operation Blessing, told CBN News.


A documentary from Operation Blessing set to release just before the games may help curb sex trafficking, its creators hope. 


"We're trying to raise the stigma against this and educate the people coming in for the World Cup that this isn't just a service you can buy without consequences, that these are children trapped in a hell," David Darg, vice president of International Operations for Operation Blessing, said. "We see kids, talking 12 or 11 if you haven't lost your virginity at 11 you're wrong--something's wrong with you. I see many, many cases of mothers selling their daughters like to neighbors, on the street, taking them to the street, teaching them kind of the business, to survive."


Air the Operation Blessing documentary on national television and do more to protect children from sex trafficking within Brazil's borders.

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