Ban Trapping in Mexican Wolf Recovery Range

  • by: Animal Advocates
  • target: U.S. Department of the Interior, Assistant Secretary Fish and Wildlife and Parks, Southwest Regional Director U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA Forest Service Region 3

Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area stretches across east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico. This area includes the Apache National Forest and the Gila National Forest, and accounts for more than 6800 square miles of territory.

Wolf trapping on federal land hinders wolf restoration and the harm caused to wolves by traps violates the Endangered Species Act. Since 2002, traps have injured or killed 14 Mexican grey wolves.Two had entire limbs amputated, one endured a partial foot amutation and dozens have simply vanished.

Wolves harmed or killed by traps and snares have their chance of survival greatly reduced. They sustain tissue damage and other injuries that reduce their fitness to care for and feed their pups. In addition to the physcial damage, wolves endure psychological trauma, dehydration, and exposure.

With fewer than 60 Mexican wolves in the bi-state recovery area, wolf trapping is very poor management. Ban trapping of the Mecican grey wolf in the Blue Range Recovery Area.

David Hayes
Assistant Secretary Fish and Wildlife and Parks
Washington, D.C. Office
555 Eleventh Street, NW
Suite 1000
Washington DC 20004-1304
202.637.2204 Phone
202.637.2201 Fax
david.hayes@lw.com

Ken Salazar
Secretary of the Interior
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W. / Washington DC 20240
feedback@ios.doi.gov
Secretary_of_the_Interior@ios.doi.gov

Dr. Benjamin Tuggle- Southwest Regional Director
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
P.O. Box 1306
Albuquerque, NM 87103-1306
Phone: 505-248-6911
Email: RDTuggle@fws.gov

Corbin Newman- Southwest Regional Forester
USDA Forest Service Region 3
333 Broadway SE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Phone: 505-842-3292
Fax: 505-842-3198
Contact: http://www.fs.fed.us/contactus/

Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area stretches across east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico. This area includes the Apache National Forest and the Gila National Forest, and accounts for more than 6800 square miles of territory.


Wolf trapping on federal land hinders wolf restoration and the harm caused to wolves by traps violates the Endangered Species Act. Since 2002, traps have injured or killed 14 Mexican grey wolves.Two had entire limbs amputated, one endured a partial foot amutation and dozens have simply vanished.


Wolves harmed or killed by traps and snares have their chance of survival greatly reduced. They sustain tissue damage and other injuries that reduce their fitness to care for and feed their pups. In addition to the physcial damage, wolves endure psychological trauma, dehydration, and exposure.


With fewer than 60 Mexican wolves in the bi-state recovery area, wolf trapping is very poor management. Ban trapping of the Mecican grey wolf in the Blue Range Recovery Area.

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