Protect Whooping Cranes

  • By: Animal Advocates
  • Target:  President Barack Obama, Ken Salazar, Secretary of Interior

The proposed 1700-mile Keystone pipeline XL would destroy vulnerable habitats and harm many endangered creatures.

 

The open pit mines of the destructive tar sands in Alberta, (that currently courses through two existing pipelines that crisscross our country), is hampering international efforts to protect endangered and threatened species. It is harming threatened woodland caribou and at least 130 migratory bird species, including endangered whooping cranes.

 

Endangered whooping cranes are particularly vulnerable. The entire global population of wild, migratory whooping cranes migrates through the tar sands region twice annually. The birds land in toxic wastewater pits, mistaking them for freshwater ponds.

 

Habitat disruption and fragmentation are the driving forces of the population’s decline. We ask for a full investigation to determine whether tar sands activities are violating treaties that protect endangered and threatened species before there is "appoval" of the pipeline to proceed through the length of the United States.

 

President Barack Obama

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Washington, DC 20500

Phone: (202)456.1111
Fax: (202)456-2461

Email: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/

 

Ken Salazar

Secretary of the Interior
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W. / Washington DC 20240
feedback@ios.doi.gov
Secretary_of_the_Interior@ios.doi.gov

The proposed 1700-mile Keystone pipeline XL would destroy vulnerable habitats and harm many endangered creatures.



 



The open pit mines of the destructive tar sands in Alberta, (that currently courses through two existing pipelines that crisscross our country), is hampering international efforts to protect endangered and threatened species. It is harming threatened woodland caribou and at least 130 migratory bird species, including endangered whooping cranes.



 



Endangered whooping cranes are particularly vulnerable. The entire global population of wild, migratory whooping cranes migrates through the tar sands region twice annually. The birds land in toxic wastewater pits, mistaking them for freshwater ponds.



 



Habitat disruption and fragmentation are the driving forces of the population’s decline. We ask for a full investigation to determine whether tar sands activities are violating treaties that protect endangered and threatened species before there is "appoval" of the pipeline to proceed through the length of the United States.


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