Outlaw Speeding Traps in the US

Our nation's greatest companies (i.e. Apple, Google) have achieved success by philisophically putting the customer first, not the suppliers, employees or short term profit. In the same way, our government can do the most good for society by philosophically putting the constituent first, not special interests, not fellow government employees and not revenue generation. In the spirit of this philosophy, are speeding traps improving driver safety, or is this simply abusive revenue generation? In this day and age, can we not find better solutions to improving safety than issuing expensive tickets that cancel out one's earnings for the day? And who sets the amounts of the fines? Is a $120 fine justified for going 1-5 miles over the speed limit? Isn't it time for America to reduce the amount of money we waste on ticketing ourselves and start implementing less wasteful solutions like radar warning signs? The tax and ticket money our communities save is money spent on things that improve our standard of living, like home improvements, not traffic police which mainly produce frustration and fear.

1. Outlaw speeding, parking and other traffic traps in all states, not just California. Entrapment is prohibited by the 4th Amendment.
2. Set reasonable maximum limits to fines. The punishment should fit the crime.
3. No tickets can be issued for keeping it under 10 over.
4. Outlaw ticket quotas for police. Let's spend our money on things like home improvements, not salaries and tickets written by police.

We the people decide how we want to be policed. Let's put it to a vote at our next elections. Please pass this on to your friends.

To the United States Congress,

Speeding traps have been outlawed in many cities and states across our union, and for good reason. They violate the 4th Amendent - entrapment. They don't improve safety as much they frustrate hard-working constituents. They are unproductive and do not serve to improve our standard of living.

Our nation's greatest companies (i.e. Apple, Google) have achieved success by philisophically putting the customer first, not the suppliers, employees or short term profit. In the same way, our government can do the most good for society by philosophically putting the constituent first, not special interests, not fellow government employees and not revenue generation. In the spirit of this philosophy, are speeding traps improving driver safety, or is this simply abusive revenue generation? In this day and age, can we not find better solutions to improving safety than issuing expensive tickets that cancel out one's earnings for the day? And who sets the amounts of the fines? Is a $120 fine justified for going 1-5 miles over the speed limit? Isn't it time for America to reduce the amount of money we waste on ticketing ourselves and start implementing less wasteful solutions like radar warning signs? The tax and ticket money our communities save is money spent on things that improve our standard of living, like home improvements, not traffic police which mainly produce frustration and fear of being ticketed.

1. Outlaw speeding, parking and other traffic traps in all states, not just some cities and states like California. Entrapment is prohibited by the 4th Amendment.
2. Set reasonable maximum limits to fines. The punishment should fit the crime. In West Michigan, the fine is $100 for going 1-5 miles over the speed limit, and $130 for 25 over. It seems to me that going 1 mph over is far less of an offense than driving 25 over, yet the fine amounts are relatively close.
3. No tickets can be issued for keeping it under 10 over.
4. Outlaw ticket quotas for police. Let's spend our money on things like home improvements, not ticketing police.

If this is something the Federal government would prefer to leave up to the states and communities, than please send a recommendation to the states. Improving our traffic policing process will make the US a better place to live.

Sincerest Regards,

Citizens of the United States

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