STOP THE WOLF HARVEST FOR STATE OF MINNESOTA

  • By: Kim Beyer
  • Target: Minnesota Politicians/Governor Dayton /DNR ! Minnesota has caused Extinction to The Grizzly Bear/ Brown Bear/ Wolverine , Elk,Caribou,American Bison,Whopping Crane, Moose,Swift Fox

 Minnesota Legislators are pleased with the results of the wolf season.I think it’s been going very, very well, said Rep. Tom Hack Barth Hackbarth  former environment and natural resource personally believed the 400-animal cutoff should have been higher One lawmaker with a fresh wolf pelt currently on a stretcher-board in his basement is Rep. Dan Fabian, R-Roseau. Fabian, who teams with a friend, a federal trapper, trapped a 95-pound wolf   Fabian said while working a long trap line through the Beltrami Island State Forest area. They trapped a second wolf at exactly the same spot as the first, “It’s very, very educational for me,” said Fabian, an “avid” sportsman, of learning how to trap. This education includes learning to skin a wolf and prepare the pelt. One day the pelt, measuring more than 7 feet in length, may be on display in Fabian’s legislative office in St. Paul.

Like Hack Barth, Fabian wanted the quota  to be higher than 400 animals.

Dayton says the hunt was established by the legislature and if people disagree with the hunt, they should take it up with their legislator.

You mean these The ones with the pelt and skinning lessons?

Results from the 2013 wolf survey continue to demonstrate that Minnesota’s wolf population is fully recovered from its once threatened status and Minnesota had a stable wolf population of about 3,000 animals going into the hunting and trapping season. Wolf population – now estimated at 2,200 – has fully recovered .Last winter that estimated the state’s wolf population at 2,211 — a 24 percent decline from 2008,We project that the 2012 pre-hunt wolf population    2,600, harvest of 413 wolves during the 2012 wolf season represents 16% of the population.  2,211 wolves last winter  down 710 wolves from the survey five years ago perhaps 300 fewer wolves than the 2007 Minnesota's wolf population is down about 700 wolves from five years ago, but the population still is stableThe  Federal recovery goal  is 1,251  to 1,400. Well with 2 hunting seasons , What does that mean for the wolf and it's survival? In a wolf population that remains at the same level from one year to the next, about 35 percent of adult wolves die each year    the population is responding naturally the availability of deer, wolves’ primary 2013 population estimate, which dropped from the 2009 estimate of 2,900 wolves, correlates well with the fact that wolves' primary food source,” said Dan Stark, DNR large carnivore specialist .I recently completed a comprehensive 15-year study of white-tailed deer From 1991 to 2005, a total of only7 of 677 female deer  were killed by wolves; these occurred over six of the fifteen  seasons. No deer were killed by wolves during the other nine  seasons. During the Octobers preceding only seven other females were killed by wolves over the 15 years.  Minnesota has caused Extinction to The Elk,Caribou,Bison,Whopping Crane Moose ,Red Fox and Now they want the wolf

From the 1800 to 1900 there were 400 wolves Then in 2006 434 wolves. Then 687 wolves in 2011 The population seems to be stabilizing and in 2008 a total of 2,921wolves were estimated in Wolves in the Western Great Lakes states represent an a mixture of both gray and eastern wolves.NOTICE IT SAYS WESTERN GREAT LAKES NOT JUST MINNESOTA

 

 

Do Wolf Tracks and Few Deer

In Your Fall Hunting Area

Mean What

You Think

They Mean?

1

| www.mndeerhunters.com | WHITETALES - Fall 009

By Glenn D. DelGiudice, Ph.D.

Forest Wildlife Populations & Research Group

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

The Wolf Harvest , Here are The Facts and Misleading information

Hackbarth, former environment and natural resources committee chairman, personally believed the 400-animal cutoff should have been higher.

But the DNR went with a more conservative number, and he accepted it, Hackbarth said.

Incoming House Environment and Natural Resources Policy Committee Chairman David Dill, DFL-Crane Lake, also said the season was going well.

“I have not heard a single complaint by any hunter or trapper,” said Dill, speaking in late December.

Although withholding judgment for now, Dill senses the reason why zones have closed early is because the state’s wolf population is actually larger than currently believed.

“That’s what I suspect,” he said.

Hunters in the early wolf-hunting season, that closed on Nov. 18, took 147 wolves.

In the east-central zone, hunters registered eight wolves, with 61 wolves being registered in the northeast zone and 78 in the northwest zone.

At that time, DNR officials thought the wolf-harvest trend mirrored the deer harvest,

“The harvest was highest at the beginning of the season, then declined as fewer hunters returned afield,” said Stark said in a press release.

One lawmaker with a fresh wolf pelt currently on a stretcher-board in his basement is Rep. Dan Fabian, R-Roseau.

Fabian, who teams with a friend, a federal trapper, trapped a 95-pound wolf — good-size for the area, Fabian said — while working a long trap line through the Beltrami Island State Forest area.

They trapped a second wolf at exactly the same spot as the first, Fabian said.

The trappers used scent to lure the animals.

“It’s very, very educational for me,” said Fabian, an “avid” sportsman, of learning how to trap.

This education includes learning to skin a wolf and prepare the pelt.

One day the pelt, measuring more than 7 feet in length, may be on display in Fabian’s legislative office in St. Paul.

Like Hackbarth, Fabian wanted the wolf quota to be higher than 400 animals.

But he appreciates the “compromise” was a means of getting the legislation through, he explained.

Fabian has “no doubt” the wolf range in Minnesota is expanding and suspects the number of wolves is under-counted.

As for this season’s harvest numbers, a nationally recognized wolf expert suggests there may not be a lot of information to be culled.

University of Minnesota professor and U.S. Geological Survey biologist Dave Mech, who testified before legislative committees last year, indicated little can be extracted from the early harvest numbers.

There’s so much chance involved in wolf-hunter success, Mech said in an email, “nothing much” can be concluded.

“I said before the hunt and still believe that any result would not have surprised me,” he said.

In testimony last year, Mech, who has spent 53 years studying wolves, styled the DNR wolf management proposal as excellent.

Wolves are anything but stationary, he explained in testimony.

Wolf packs may have ranges of 60 to 80 square miles, with the animals travelling 13, 14, 15 miles a day.

In Minnesota wolves largely feed on deer, an adult wolf consuming the equivalent of about 18 deer a year.

From 1991 to 2005, a total of only

7 of 677 female deer radio-monitored during the November

firearm seasons were killed by wolves; these occurred over six

of the fifteen firearm seasons. No deer were killed by wolves

during the other nine firearm seasons. During the Octobers

preceding those firearm seasons, only seven other females were

killed by wolves over the 15 years. Similar study findings were

documented in a long-term study in northeastern Minnesota by

research biologists, Drs. Michael Nelson and David Mech.

So if successful wolf predation doesn’t explain the apparent

Finally, in some areas deer densities may actually be low

in a given firearm season, because numbers of deer in the

larger surrounding vicinity (or Permit Area) have decreased.

Reductions may be due to recent winter severities and associated

lower survival rates, low subsequent survival of newborn fawns,

greater recent hunter harvests, or some combination of these

sources of mortality. Greater hunter harvests may have been

a deliberate management strategy applied by issuing increased

numbers of antlerless permits to bring the local population

closer to goal, or it may have been unintentional. In the latter

case, management cannot precisely control the actual harvest;

consequently, sometimes more deer are taken than intended

Comments are closed.

Marketplace & Voices

 

Legislators are pleased with the results of the wolf season

We have time to maybe stop the harvest in Minnesota heres the latestMinnesota’s early season wolf hunters have taken 61 wolves so far. Twenty-two of them had been taken in the Northeast Wolf Zone, where the target harvest is 33. In the Northwest Wolf Zone, hunters had taken 39 wolves, and the target harvest is 73. The early-season wolf hunt ends Nov. 24 in Series 100 deer permit areas and Sunday in Series 200 permit areas. A late-season wolf hunting and trapping season in Minnesota opens Nov. 30 and runs through Jan. 31 or until target harvest quotas are reached. Wisconsin hunters and trappers had taken a total of 206 wolves from a quota of 251 as of Thursday. Only Zone 3 of Wisconsin’s six wolf zones remained open. Harvest quotas have been reached in all other zones.


These are The words from The DNR and Biologist and Legislators in Minnesota. Contradictions are to many for them to be telling the truth, and hunting should have never been allowed on misleading data , they say 2221, 2220,3000,2900, 2600, and then they say Wolves


population exceeds the state’s minimum goal of at least 1,600 wolves and is above the federal recovery goal range of 1,251 to 1,400 animals.


 Survey results estimate that within Minnesota’s wolf range there were 438 packs and 2,211 wolves last winter – down 710 wolves from the survey five years ago. So last winter Minnesota had 710 less wolves from 2008 started with 2,200 killed 431 that left  1,791 not counting the loss of wolves in other ways adding 200 more that left 1,790 wolves .And hunting season is going on right now we will have with 220 hunted that leaves 1,570 That is Between federal recovery and below 1,600 .Stop The late season harvest before any more die.


number with a 90% accuracy 1,652 wolves to 2,640 wolves


The 90% confidence interval ranges from1,652 wolves to 2,640 wolves then they say , Minnesota's wolf population – now estimated at 2,200 – has fully recovered from its once threatened status and is firmly established on Minnesota's landscape.Then they say   ,2013 population estimate, which dropped from the 2009 estimate of 2,900 wolves Then they sayMinnesota’s wolf range there were 438 packs and 2,211 wolves last winter – down 710 wolvesThen they say ,wolf population survey estimate of 2,921 wolves, the population exceeds the state’s minimum goal of at least 1,600 wolves and is above the federal recovery goal range of 1,251 to 1,400 animals.hen they say Officials estimated there were about 2,200 wolves in the state last winter down about 700 wolve from five years ago. Well above the range  they say but with 90% accuracy we start at 1624 wolves That is why wolves should have never  been allowed to be hunted.


 It is all about Greed and Their power .


                                Their Words from The Star Tribune..


One lawmaker with a fresh wolf pelt currently on a stretcher-board in his basement is Rep. Dan Fabian, R-Roseau.


Fabian, who teams with a friend, a federal trapper, trapped a 95-pound wolf — good-size for the area, Fabian said — while working a long trap line through the Beltrami Island State Forest area.


They trapped a second wolf at exactly the same spot as the first, Fabian said.


The trappers used scent to lure the animals.


“It’s very, very educational for me,” said Fabian, an “avid” sportsman, of learning how to trap.


This education includes learning to skin a wolf and prepare the pelt.


One day the pelt, measuring more than 7 feet in length, may be on display in Fabian’s legislative office in St. Paul.


Like Hackbarth, Fabian wanted the wolf quota to be higher than 400 animals.


But he appreciates the “compromise” was a means of getting the legislation through, he explained.


 Dayton says the hunt was established by the legislature and if people disagree with the hunt, they should take it up with their legislator.


 Wolves are not biologically in danger of extinction and should be removed from the ... There are 1,500 to 2,000 wolves in Minnesota


Man has Literally just about took every peice of land and everything away from all Wildlife .They have destroyed It to the brink of there is going to be nothing left but them, Maybe they will then get the Karma they deserve.

Update #32 years ago
After wolf quotas are met after this Hunting Season there will be 1578 wolves in Minnesota of Wolves and 338 in Wisconsin . Well below what They wanted ..It will take Years to get the population back up. By then will make sure There is No more Hunting . They will be Extinct Like the rest of The wildlife in Minnesota, we have to never give up the fight even after hunting season is over they will not win..
Update #22 years ago

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