Take the No More Wild Pets Pledge

Take the pledge to keep the wild in your heart, not your home. 

Wild animals are not pets.

Every year, thousands of big cats are sold as pets. 

What happens to these animals is criminal.

Some are abused or neglected, others are simply abandoned.

All are denied their right to be wild.

The Wildcat Sanctuary hopes to change all that.

Our mission is simple: to provide a natural sanctuary to wild cats in need and inspire change to end the captive wildlife crisis. 

You can help.  Adopt an appropriate pet and keep the wild in your heart, not your home.

NoMoreWildPets.org.

 

Dear Tammy and The Wildcat Sanctuary,









I support No More Wild Pets.









No home, no cage, no backyard will ever replace a wild animals’ natural habitat.  A ban on breeding and private ownership, as well as educating the public about the problems of trying to keep wild animals as pets, is our only hope for solving this captive crisis.









Please use my signature to help end the captive wildlife crisis:









As of 2012, there are estimated 10,000-20,000 big cats in private hands – and they just keep breeding. These aren’t in zoos and accredited facilities, as you might think. Surprisingly, 95% of all tigers in the US are privately owned.









Wild animals can be bought at auctions, from backyard breeders, on the illegal black market, via internet brokers, stolen from their natural wild habitats, or picked up as discarded surplus from zoos, roadside attractions, game ranches, etc.









Even though big cats can be deadly, 8 states in the US still refuse to require even a permit or license in order to buy one.  As of June 2011, only 21 states ban private ownership of exotics, 8 states have a partial ban, and 13 states require a permit or license. 









In the US, 21 people have died and 246 have been mauled by exotic cats since 2000. Captive tigers alone have killed at least 12 people in the US and mauled about 75 more.  There have been 253 escapes, 143 big cat deaths and 131 confiscations.









In 2011, there were only 105 inspectors to monitor 7,976 facilities, ranging from pet stores and circuses to slaughterhouses, laboratories and breeders.  Just because a facility has a USDA license, it doesn’t assure the animals are well cared for.  Only minimal standards are required for a license.









It can take 5-10 years for authorities to shut down a substandard USDA licensed facility with multiple violations, injuries, and/or escapes.  The legal process drags on while the animals continue to suffer and the public is at risk.









As much needed legislation is passed and greater control is brought to the largely unregulated practice of importing, breeding, buying, and selling wild animals as pets, there are likely to be confiscated or abandoned exotic animals in increasing numbers. Critical to this will be the provision of accredited and secure facilities like The Wildcat Sanctuary and other wild animal sanctuaries to provide big cat rescue services and appropriate life-long care for all these animals.









Together, we can create a world where wild animals are no longer kept as pets.

































































































































Dear Legislatros:

































































We can make a huge impact on improving life for millions of animals in our country by simply educating the public about the importance of choosing appropriate pets.  Because there’s little regulation, exotic ownership has turned into a multi-billion dollar industry.  When a baby tiger cub can be purchased for less than the cost of a purebred dog, we have a serious problem on our hands.  At first cute and cuddly, they soon grow into dangerous carnivores that are, all too often, destined to life in a backyard cage under deplorable conditions.  Unlike domestic pets, there are few rehoming options for unwanted exotics. There can never be enough sanctuaries to take in all these unwanted animals.

































































































































·         As of 2012, there are estimated 10,000-20,000 big cats in private hands – and they just keep breeding. These aren’t in zoos and accredited facilities, as you might think. Surprisingly, 95% of all tigers in the US are privately owned.

































































































































·         Wild animals can be bought at auctions, from backyard breeders, on the illegal black market, via internet brokers, stolen from their natural wild habitats, or picked up as discarded surplus from zoos, roadside attractions, game ranches, etc.

































































































































·         Even though big cats can be deadly, 8 states in the US still refuse to require even a permit or license in order to buy one.  As of June 2011, only 21 states ban private ownership of exotics, 8 states have a partial ban, and 13 states require a permit or license. 

































































































































·         In the US, 21 people have died and 246 have been mauled by exotic cats since 2000. Captive tigers alone have killed at least 12 people in the US and mauled about 75 more.  There have been 253 escapes, 143 big cat deaths and 131 confiscations.

































































































































·         In 2011, there were only 105 inspectors to monitor 7,976 facilities, ranging from pet stores and circuses to slaughterhouses, laboratories and breeders.  Just because a facility has a USDA license, it doesn’t assure the animals are well cared for.  Only minimal standards are required for a license.

































































































































·         It can take 5-10 years for authorities to shut down a substandard USDA licensed facility with multiple violations, injuries, and/or escapes.  The legal process drags on while the animals continue to suffer and the public is at risk.

































































































































·         As much needed legislation is passed and greater control is brought to the largely unregulated practice of importing, breeding, buying, and selling wild animals as pets, there are likely to be confiscated or abandoned exotic animals in increasing numbers. Critical to this will be the provision of accredited and secure facilities like The Wildcat Sanctuary and other wild animal sanctuaries to provide big cat rescue services and appropriate life-long care for all these animals.

































































































































·         Our life-saving work has helped cats from 29 states and 2 countries.

































































































































No home, no cage, no backyard will ever replace a wild animals’ natural habitat.  A ban on breeding and private ownership, as well as educating the public about the problems of trying to keep wild animals as pets, is our only hope for solving this captive crisis.

































































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