Enforce Coastline Lighting Laws -Save Sea Turtles

  • by: Lisa Phillips
  • target: City Governments; Florida beach residents; hotel, restaurant and other business owners on or near the beach

A Florida police officer saved approximately 100 baby sea turtles recently.  They were crawling up to the brightest light around - the entrance to Sarasota's Lido Beach Resor.  According to the report I read, the officer gathered the newly hatched turtles from this hotel parking lot and from the street, put them in a cardboard  box, and released them into the Gulf of Mexico.

The officer was on patrol at 1:00 am, August 3, when he noticed a baby sea turtle crawling toward the front door of Sarasota’s Lido Beach Resort. A passerby shared that he’d seen more hatchlings in the parking lot.

When he checked, he noticed that there were dozens more turtles swarming toward the hotel. Fortunately for these sea turtles, he exhibited quick thinking and compassion. He found a cardboard box, and with the help of some of the hotel’s guests, gathered up the slow-moving creatures which were located in the parking lot and crossing surrounding streets. 

Sea turtles are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act and the Florida Marine Protection Act.

Each year, sea turtles make 40,00 to 84,000 nests in thte state of Florida.  They nest along the  beaches from May until late October.  They are supposed to be protected under state statutes.

Hatchlings usually emerge from their nests at night. Only about 1 in  1,000 baby turtles survive to adulthood. Their lives are perilous from the start.  State of Florida residents and business owners need to do their part.  They should obey the lighting and development laws.  Turtles are part of our ocean's ecosystem - in other words, they help to maintain a healthy ocean.  It makes sense to protect them. 

 

A Florida police officer saved approximately 100 baby sea turtles recently.  They were crawling up to the brightest light around - the entrance to Sarasota's Lido Beach Resor.  According to the report I read, the officer gathered the newly hatched turtles from this hotel parking lot and from the street, put them in a cardboard  box, and released them into the Gulf of Mexico.



The officer was on patrol at 1:00 am, August 3, when he noticed a baby sea turtle crawling toward the front door of Sarasota’s Lido Beach Resort. A passerby shared that he’d seen more hatchlings in the parking lot.



When he checked, he noticed that there were dozens more turtles swarming toward the hotel. Fortunately for these sea turtles, he exhibited quick thinking and compassion. He found a cardboard box, and with the help of some of the hotel’s guests, gathered up the slow-moving creatures which were located in the parking lot and crossing surrounding streets. 



Sea turtles are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act and the Florida Marine Protection Act.



Each year, sea turtles make 40,00 to 84,000 nests in thte state of Florida.  They nest along the  beaches from May until late October.  They are supposed to be protected under state statutes.



Hatchlings usually emerge from their nests at night. Only about 1 in  1,000 baby turtles survive to adulthood. Their lives are perilous from the start.  State of Florida residents and business owners need to do their part.  They should obey the lighting and development laws.  Turtles are part of our ocean's ecosystem - in other words, they help to maintain a healthy ocean.  It makes sense to protect them. 


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