Call for Federal Investigation of Wolf Management Plans

We call upon Federal Agencies to investigate the current policies and practices of the inhumane wolf management plans currently operating in Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Washington State and Michigan which appear to be aimed at making the wolf extinct within a few years. 

Current wolf management practices and plans for the future ensure wolves will not be able to regenerate their packs. Less wolves mean ecosystems will suffer without their presence as top predators who keep grazing animals from destroying the native flora and wider environment.

We ask for federal investigations of these plans for the following reasons:

1.  There is no promotion of non-lethal methods of wolf control 
There is no promotion of successful non-lethal techniques of wolf management which have been proven to deter wolves from bothering livestock. We feel this is evidence that these States do not want to 'manage' wolves, but to eliminate them. 
2.  The use of Wildlife Services, the federal government's agency for pest control, to kill wolves
The definition of wolves as 'pests' indicates the States want all wolves to be killed. The Sacramento Bee newspaper recently unveiled the inhumane pest control methods used by the Wildlife Services. We feel one of the questionable practices is the killing of wolves from helicopters.  The Service  was used by Washington State to eliminate the Wedge Pack because it may have been bothering the livestock of one farmer who refused to use non-lethal ways of wolf control. Currently Idaho is considering using Wildlife Services to exterminate wolf packs they find impossible to kill by other means.
3. Legalization of year round hunting, trapping and trophy kills 
Instead of promoting non-lethal ways of wolf control, the States are promoting hunting and trapping of wolves as a way to raise revenue through the sale of permits and the promotion of trophy hunting for residents and out-of-state hunters. However, the States are not being transparent about the number of wolves killed, the amount of money it cost to kill them and whether the 'war on wolves' has been profitable. Idaho has a year round wolf hunting season, while large areas of other states also encourage year round hunting.
4. Because hunters have found wolves difficult targets, more methods of killing have been legalized 
There is pending legislation to allow hunters to use guns without silencers so wolves will not hear shots being fired. One piece of successful legislation allows hunters to use dogs to hunt wolves. Another will allow skinned wolf carcasses to be used as trap bait. These 'innovations' are evidence that States will try any method to help hunters kill as many wolves as they can.
5. The introduction of wolf trapping seasons to ensure the maximum number of wolves will be killed
Trapping is an inefficient way of controlling any wild animal who escapes the guns of hunters. Non-target wildlife and domestic animals often fall prey to traps. Traps are placed in public areas, making it dangerous for people and their pets to visit and enjoy our wild places. While traps have been developed not to damage fur and break the 'pelt', the painful agony wolves endure before they are shot or clubbed to death is unnecessary and inhumane. Current legislation in Idaho which is particularly objectionable would allow trappers to used skinned wolf carcasses, an approach designed to attract the dead wolf's pack members who will search out the missing wolf.
6. Targeting of radio collared wolves
State laws encourage the killing of wolves born and raised in Yellowstone Park by allowing hunting and trapping up to the borders of our national park where radio collared research wolves appear to be targeted as a trophies.The refusal to establish a buffer zone around Yellowstone suggests the States want as much wolf territory as possible to be killing territory. Over a dozen Yellowstone wolves have been killed, including 06, a well known and much loved Alpha female. At least two radio collared wolves have been targeted in Idaho, 0R-9 was killed in 2012, while OR-16 was killed in January 2013. The destruction of research wolves is evidence the wolf hunting States do not care about the research and fiancial investment they represent for planning our future with wolves. The only interest the States show is to exterminate as many wolves as possible.
7. Relocation of wolves
Current legislation in Washington State calls for the relocation of wolf packs from one part of the state to another. This is unlikely to be an efficient form of management as wolves are territorial and will return to their original homes, becoming the prey of hunters and trappers who will be waiting for them.  The relocation of wolves in Washington State is a certain death sentence for all wolves in the State.
8. Farmers and ranchers allowed to kill wolves
Pending legislation in Washington State would give farmers and ranchers the power to kill wolves without confirmation that wolves were the animals bothering their livestock. This shoot-on-sight policy is evidence Washington State legislators do not want wolves in the State.

WE believe wolf all wolf management plans must be investigated by federal agencies in order to establish a continuity of approach among the states which promotes humane, non-lethal ways of wolf control over questionable hunting and trapping practices. While we acknowledge States are experiencing difficult economic times, we also believe that citizens of these states have the intelligence to create  more profitable long term income earners other than the killing of wolves which has a short term goal. Diminishing wolf populations mean less income for States with every hunting season and when wolves are finally made extinct, there will be no income. We feel federal investigations will help States make the right choices for their citizens and for our wild environments.

Thank you.
 

Dear _________

We call upon Federal Agencies to investigate the current policies and practices of the inhumane wolf management plans currently operating in Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Washington State and Michigan which appear to be aimed at making the wolf extinct within a few years. 

Current wolf management practices and plans for the future ensure wolves will not be able to regenerate their packs. Less wolves mean ecosystems will suffer without their presence as top predators who keep grazing animals from destroying the native flora and wider environment.

We ask for federal investigations of these plans for the following reasons:

1.  There is no promotion of non-lethal methods of wolf control 
There is no promotion of successful non-lethal techniques of wolf management which have been proven to deter wolves from bothering livestock. We feel this is evidence that these States do not want to 'manage' wolves, but to eliminate them.
2.  The use of Wildlife Services, the federal government's agency for pest control, to kill wolves
The definition of wolves as 'pests' indicates the States want all wolves to be killed. The Sacramento Bee newspaper recently unveiled the inhumane pest control methods used by the Wildlife Services. We feel one of the questionable practices is the killing of wolves from helicopters.  The Service  was used by Washington State to eliminate the Wedge Pack because it may have been bothering the livestock of one farmer who refused to use non-lethal ways of wolf control. Currently Idaho is considering using Wildlife Services to exterminate wolf packs they find impossible to kill by other means.
3. Legalization of year round hunting, trapping and trophy kills 
Instead of promoting non-lethal ways of wolf control, the States are promoting hunting and trapping of wolves as a way to raise revenue through the sale of permits and the promotion of trophy hunting for residents and out-of-state hunters. However, the States are not being transparent about the number of wolves killed, the amount of money it cost to kill them and whether the 'war on wolves' has been profitable. Idaho has a year round wolf hunting season, while large areas of other states also encourage year round hunting.
4. Because hunters have found wolves difficult targets, more methods of killing have been legalized 
There is pending legislation to allow hunters to use guns without silencers so wolves will not hear shots being fired. One piece of successful legislation allows hunters to use dogs to hunt wolves. Another will allow skinned wolf carcasses to be used as trap bait. These 'innovations' are evidence that States will try any method to help hunters kill as many wolves as they can.
5. The introduction of wolf trapping seasons to ensure the maximum number of wolves will be killed
Trapping is an inefficient way of controlling any wild animal who escapes the guns of hunters. Non-target wildlife and domestic animals often fall prey to traps. Traps are placed in public areas, making it dangerous for people and their pets to visit and enjoy our wild places. While traps have been developed not to damage fur and break the 'pelt', the painful agony wolves endure before they are shot or clubbed to death is unnecessary and inhumane. Current legislation in Idaho which is particularly objectionable would allow trappers to used skinned wolf carcasses, an approach designed to attract the dead wolf's pack members who will search out the missing wolf.
6. Targeting of radio collared wolves
State laws encourage the killing of wolves born and raised in Yellowstone Park by allowing hunting and trapping up to the borders of our national park where radio collared research wolves appear to be targeted as a trophies.The refusal to establish a buffer zone around Yellowstone suggests the States want as much wolf territory as possible to be killing territory. Over a dozen Yellowstone wolves have been killed, including 06, a well known and much loved Alpha female. At least two radio collared wolves have been targeted in Idaho, 0R-9 was killed in 2012, while OR-16 was killed in January 2013. The destruction of research wolves is evidence the wolf hunting States do not care about the research and fiancial investment they represent for planning our future with wolves. The only interest the States show is to exterminate as many wolves as possible.
7. Relocation of wolves
Current legislation in Washington State calls for the relocation of wolf packs from one part of the state to another. This is unlikely to be an efficient form of management as wolves are territorial and will return to their original homes, becoming the prey of hunters and trappers who will be waiting for them.  The relocation of wolves in Washington State is a certain death sentence for all wolves in the State.
8. Farmers and ranchers allowed to kill wolves
Pending legislation in Washington State would give farmers and ranchers the power to kill wolves without confirmation that wolves were the animals bothering their livestock. This shoot-on-sight policy is evidence Washington State legislators do not want wolves in the State.

WE believe wolf all wolf management plans must be investigated by federal agencies in order to establish a continuity of approach among the states which promotes humane, non-lethal ways of wolf control over questionable hunting and trapping practices. While we acknowledge States are experiencing difficult economic times, we also believe that citizens of these states have the intelligence to create  more profitable long term income earners other than the killing of wolves which has a short term goal. Diminishing wolf populations mean less income for States with every hunting season and when wolves are finally made extinct, there will be no income. We feel federal investigations will help States make the right choices for their citizens and for our wild environments.

Thank you.
 

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