Tell Canada's politicians to cut our immigration intake.

If you believe that Canada admits too many immigrants, you’re not alone. Polls show that about half of your fellow citizens, including immigrants, feel that Canada admits too many immigrants.

Since 1991 Canada has admitted about 250,000 newcomers to the country each year, and some want to increase that level to 500,000! Yet no regard is given to the economic, environmental, social and cultural impacts that current immigration levels are having on Canada.

According to 2006 Statistics Canada census data, the median real earnings of Canadians did not change between 1980 and 2005, while those of the top 20% increased by 20.6% and those of the bottom 20% fell by 16.4%. With a current unemployment rate of nearly 7%, there is no need for a mass intake of newcomers.

Canada has lost 3.9 million hectares of prime farmland, about the size of Vancouver Island, since 1971, and the increase in Canada's population by close to 7 million people has put enormous strain on the roads and other infrastructure of our cities. The additional people have created congestion and loss of greenspace. The number of ethnic enclaves in Canada has mushroomed from 6 to 260 between 1981 and 2012. This has led to the loss of some of our best agricultural land, and put severe pressure on the environment.

Furthermore, Canadian citizens have never been consulted on the immigration policy that is changing their country's culture and society, testing the limits of the country's economic, social, and cultural capacity to absorb so many people, and placing a severe strain on its environment and biodiversity.

Therefore, we call upon our government to greatly reduce immigration intake to levels that benefit all Canadians and to develop an immigration policy that takes into account the impact of immigration on the economy, the environment, and the limited capacity of Canadian society to integrate people from many different cultural backgrounds.

We as Canadian citizens are concerned with the economic, environmental, social and cultural impacts that current immigration levels are having on Canada.

According to 2006 Statistics Canada census data, the median real earnings of Canadians did not change between 1980 and 2005, while those of the top 20% increased by 20.6% and those of the bottom 20% fell by 16.4%. Although the very high levels of immigration driving Canada's growth were allegedly for economic benefits, they have only redistributed the income in favour of the wealthy with the importation of cheap labour. With a current unemployment rate of nearly 7%, there is no need for a mass intake of newcomers. A study published in 2011 by two economists, Herbert Grubel and Patrick Grady, found that recent immigrants to Canada cost the government $23 billion more in services than they pay in taxes. Based on analysis of more recent data, the estimated cost of fiscal transfers to immigrants is even higher, ranging from $27 to $35 billion in 2014.

Canada has lost 3.9 million hectares of prime farmland, about the size of Vancouver Island, since 1971. The increase in Canada's population by 7 million people over what it would have been without the massive increase in immigration beginning in 1990, has put enormous strain on the roads and other infrastructure of our cities, and created congestion and loss of greenspace, with "densification" and "smart growth" becoming euphemisms for "ever more growth." Habitat loss and other human activities are putting Canada's biodiversity at risk, especially in the densely populated southern areas. As a result of decades of mass immigration from around the world, the number of ethnic enclaves in Canada mushroomed from 6 to 260 between 1981 and 2012, with concomitant social stresses.

In short, the policy of continuously high levels of intake pursued for the past 25 years by all governments in power has had no net economic benefit for Canadians, but has strained the infrastructure and social resources of our cities, led to the loss of some of our best agricultural land, and put severe pressure on the environment.

Furthermore, Canadian citizens have never been consulted on the immigration policy that is changing their country's culture and society, testing the limits of the country's economic, social, and cultural capacity to absorb so many people, and placing a severe strain on its environment and biodiversity.

Therefore we call upon the government to greatly reduce immigration intake to levels that benefit all Canadians and to develop an immigration policy that takes into account the impact of immigration on the economy, including wage suppression in some sectors and the shrinking prospects of young people entering the labour force; the finite physical and social resources of cities; the environment, including agricultural land and wildlife habitat; and the limited capacity of Canadian society to integrate people from many different cultural backgrounds

Sign Petition
Sign Petition
You have JavaScript disabled. Without it, our site might not function properly.

privacy policy

By signing, you accept Care2's terms of service.

Having problems signing this? Let us know.