Stop Elephant Begging

Esteemed members of the Royal Thai Parliament we petition you on behalf of the Thai Elephant.

For centuries the elephant has been a part of Thai history. The elephant is revered in Thai culture. It’s likeness can be found everywhere; at the temple, in the market, in the home and on Royal Thai Emblems, flags and signage. Elephants adorn many spectacular temples. The elephant is the single most popular likeness found in the Thai business community.  All of these facts, and many more, speak the truth that the Elephant is in fact the Symbol of Thailand. It is one of the cornerstones of Thai culture.

 Many people in this great country do not realize it, but baby elephants are being forced to beg on the streets of their great country.  This is wrong for many reasons including the fact that these elephants are poorly treated by their handlers, some of whom rent the elephants from business people and some of whom are owned by their handlers.  The handlers of the street beggars do not respect their elephants and they certainly do not deserve to be called Kwan Chang or mahout.  All they care about is the money the poor elephant can earn on the streets.  These elephants are made to walk the streets for many an hour each day.  Often they are terribly undernourished and dehydrated.  Most are baby elephants forcefully separated from their mothers long before they are ready.

Allowing baby elephants to walk the streets of Thailand is a detriment to Asian Elephant conservation efforts. A ban on street begging, well enforced will dramatically help to protect and conserve the precious Thai elephants today and for generations to come.

Another reason that elephant street begging is wrong is that it is very dangerous.  There are approximately 15 elephants injured or killed every month in traffic accidents.  These elephants are walking on the highways either begging as the go, or on their way to or from a begging area.  Not only are the elephants killed and maimed, but people are killed, maimed and injured. Their automobiles are destroyed. 

For these reasons of national pride, international reputation, elephant welfare and safety we respectfully implore you to swiftly pass legislation that would ban street begging in all of Thailand.  We would also ask that the new law carry heavy penalties to be inflicted on both the handlers and the owners of these elephants.

 

 

  

Esteemed members of the Royal Thai Parliament we the undersigned petition you on behalf of the Thai Elephant.

For centuries the elephant has been a part of Thai history. The elephant is revered in Thai culture. It’s likeness can be found everywhere; at the temple, in the market, in the home and on Royal Thai Emblems, flags and signage. Elephants adorn many spectacular temples. The elephant is the single most popular likeness found in the Thai business community.  All of these facts, and many more, speak the truth that the Elephant is in fact the Symbol of Thailand. It is one of the cornerstones of Thai culture.

 Many people in this great country do not realize it, but baby elephants are being forced to beg on the streets of their great country.  This is wrong for many reasons including the fact that these elephants are poorly treated by their handlers, some of whom rent the elephants from business people and some of whom are owned by their handlers.  The handlers of the street beggars do not respect their elephants and they certainly do not deserve to be called Kwan Chang or mahout.  All they care about is the money the poor elephant can earn on the streets.  These elephants are made to walk the streets for many an hour each day.  Often they are terribly undernourished and dehydrated.  Most are baby elephants forcefully separated from their mothers long before they are ready.

Allowing baby elephants to walk the streets of Thailand is a detriment to Asian Elephant conservation efforts. A ban on street begging, well enforced will dramatically help to protect and conserve the precious Thai elephants today and for generations to come.

Another reason that elephant street begging is wrong is that it is very dangerous.  There are approximately 15 elephants injured or killed every month in traffic accidents.  These elephants are walking on the highways either begging as the go, or on their way to or from a begging area.  Not only are the elephants killed and maimed, but people are killed, maimed and injured. Their automobiles are destroyed. 

For these reasons of national pride, international reputation, elephant welfare and safety we respectfully implore you to swiftly pass legislation that would ban street begging in all of Thailand.  We would also ask that the new law carry heavy penalties to be inflicted on both the handlers and the owners of these elephants.

 

 

  

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