Please Stop the Tiger Trade

 Please Stop the Tiger Trade!               

        This is a time of great importance for Tiger conservation; wild populations of this species are decreasing at an alarming rate. While habitat loss and prey base declines are key factors, the primary cause of the Tiger's endangerment has been considered to be China's traditional use of Tiger body parts. There has been considerable progress in China towards reducing the trade threat to wild Tigers. In the early 1990s, it was feared that Chinese demand for Tiger products would drive the Tiger to extinction by the new millennium; that the Tiger survives today is testimony to China's prompt, strict and committed action. This is a major achievement and China should be commended for their efforts thus far.        

        However, the Government of China is currently considering legalizing domestic trade in medicines from captive-bred Tigers. Overwhelming evidence stresses that a decision to re-open the trade would drive this species to extinction, wasting the significant progress China has made in tiger conservation.        

        We, the undersigned, congratulate China on their achievements in tiger conservation and ask that it maintain its leadership in wildlife-trade legislation, law enforcement, public education and conservation efforts on behalf of wild tigers in China and the rest of Asia. We ask that:    

-The Government of China should maintain its comprehensive Tiger trade ban policy.

-The Government of China should continue and strengthen law enforcement efforts against the illegal skin trade in the western parts of the country.
  

-The Government of China should reject petitions to weaken policy.


-The Government of China should establish a moratorium on Tiger breeding, and any future breeding programs should be coordinated with the aid of international efforts. Handling of current captive tiger populations, including those in large breeding facilities should be handled humanely.


-Stocks of Tiger carcasses and their parts must be destroyed, helping to ensure the ban remains effective.

Financial support for Tiger conservation in China should be directed at habitat conservation and protection measures.

-The Government of China should heighten awareness of its current ban on Tiger trade, especially in western parts of the country where awareness is lacking, issuing a clear public statement that consumption of Tiger parts for Chinese medicine or tonics under any circumstances is not permitted. Consumption of other big cat species should also be deterred.

       

        The tiger is one of the most revered, feared and popular species on Earth. It is perhaps the most powerful symbol of our planet's endangered wildlife and an important cultural icon for the people of China. With these recommendations, China will help to ensure that the tiger remain a living icon for generations to come.

 *Most suggestions and text provided by the TRAFFIC East Asia report, "Taming the Tiger Trade" found here (pdf).
        This is a time of great importance for Tiger conservation; wild populations of this species are decreasing at an alarming rate. While habitat loss and prey base declines are key factors, the primary cause of the Tiger's endangerment has been considered to be China's traditional use of Tiger bone medicines. There has been considerable progress in China towards reducing the trade threat to wild Tigers. In the early 1990s, it was feared that Chinese demand for Tiger products would drive the Tiger to extinction by the new millennium; that the Tiger survives today is testimony to China's prompt, strict and committed action. This is a major achievement and China should be commended for their efforts thus far.        

        However, the Government of China is currently considering legalizing domestic trade in medicines from captive-bred Tigers. Overwhelming evidence stresses that a decision to re-open the trade would drive this species to extinction, wasting the significant progress China has made in tiger conservation.        

        We, the undersigned, congratulate China on their achievements in tiger conservation and ask that it maintain its leadership in wildlife-trade legislation, law enforcement, public education and conservation efforts on behalf of wild tigers in China and the rest of Asia. We ask that:    

-The Government of China should maintain its comprehensive Tiger trade ban policy.

-The Government of China should continue and strengthen law enforcement efforts against the illegal skin trade in the western parts of the country.
  

-The Government of China should reject petitions to weaken policy.


-The Government of China should establish a moratorium on Tiger breeding, and any future breeding programs should be coordinated with the aid of international efforts. Handling of current captive tiger populations, including those in large breeding facilities should be handled humanely.


-Stocks of Tiger carcasses and their parts must be destroyed, helping to ensure the ban remains effective.

Financial support for Tiger conservation in China should be directed at habitat conservation and protection measures.

-The Government of China should heighten awareness of its current ban on Tiger trade, especially in western parts of the country where awareness is lacking, issuing a clear public statement that consumption of Tiger parts for Chinese medicine or tonics under any circumstances is not permitted. Consumption of other big cat species should also be deterred.
 
     
        The tiger is one of the most revered, feared and popular species on Earth. It is perhaps the most powerful symbol of our planet's endangered wildlife and an important cultural icon for the people of China. With these recommendations, China will help to ensure that the tiger remain a living icon for generations to come.

 *Most suggestions and text provided by the TRAFFIC East Asia report, "Taming the Tiger Trade" found here (pdf).
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