Scrap Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill/Act 2010

  • by: Syed Tanveeruddin
  • recipient: Supreme Court, NHRC, SHRC, NCM, President, PM, Guv, CM, Law Ministry

Last Update: Saturday, July 10, 2010 @ 11:20 hrs Indian Std. Time
Scrap the draconian Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill / Act 2010
http://www.petitiononline.com/cattleka/
http://www.petitiononline.com/straycow/
Anti-cow slaughter Bill passed amid dharna The Hindu Friday, July 16, 2010
Anti-cow slaughter Bill passed amid dharna The Hindu Fri, Jul 16, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/07/16/stories/2010071651740400.htm
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/57592/holy-cow.html
Holy cow! Deccan Herald Editorial dated Friday, March 12, 2010
The bill will act as a spur to vigilante groups.
The Yeddyurappa ministry's move to come back to the Assembly with the bill banning cow slaughter
, within days of introducing and withdrawing it, indicates muddle-headed thinking in the government. If it was assumed that wisdom had dawned on the government in the light of allround criticism over the bill, such hopes seem to have been misplaced. The bill that was tabled in the Lower House on Wednesday is a piece of legislation that was completely unnecessary, as a similar law is in force since 1964. If that law did not prove effective, the problem was with the implementation and not the law itself. The statement of objective and reasons attached to the proposed bill do not even pretend to make out a case for it.

The law virtually equates the killing of a cow with the murder of a human
, and appears to have been inspired by the Indian Wildlife Act, 1972. The latter was a law that banned hunting and poaching of wild animals for food or profit and proved crucially important in arresting poaching to a great extent. The bill in question, on the other hand, seems to have no other purpose than challenging the food habits and rights of a section of the population, since it does not mention ritualistic killing of cattle, notably buffalos that goes on with impunity in temples across Karnataka.

If the law indeed had the objective of 'preservation and improvement of the breeds of cattle,' the government would have come out with plans to revive the magnificent breeds of Indian cattle such as Hallikar, Ongole, Amrithamahal and so on instead of merely trying to hand over veterinary farms to organisations of dubious background. Section 18 that provides for 'Establishment of institutions for taking care of cattle' deepens the suspicion that the bill is less about the welfare of cattle and more about an agenda that is all too familiar.

But what is most worrisome about the bill are the penalties that it provides for
. They are draconian and are open to misinterpretation and misuse. Worse, the bill will strengthen the hands of vigilante groups in certain parts of the state that have been targeting minorities under the guise of protecting cattle. Many such groups are little more than mafia gangs that sport the facade of religion to prey on certain communities. The BJP government will do well to put the bill in cold storage and concentrate on development works.

New anti-cow slaughter law will mean total ban and heavy fine The Hindu, Friday, March 19, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/19/stories/2010031962240700.htm 
Bageshree S.
The Bill makes slaughter of all forms of cattle a punishable crime
Clause 5 prohibits 'usage and possession of beef'
The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter And Preservation Of Cattle Bill, 2010, - which was tabled in the legislature this session despite strong protests and is now awaiting passage - makes significant departures from the Karnataka Prevention Of Cow Slaughter And Cattle Preservation Act, 1964, starting with the very definition of the word "cattle".

As the very title suggests, the Bill removes any distinction between "cow" and "cattle" and makes slaughter of all forms of cattle - including he and she buffaloes - a punishable crime. Slaughter of any cattle, irrespective of its age, will be deemed a crime if the Bill replaces the Act.

Total ban
Going a step ahead, Clause 5 prohibits not only slaughter, but also "usage and possession of beef" which would practically mean a complete ban on beef eating. Clause 8 states that not only slaughter, but "sale, purchase or disposal of cattle for slaughter" when the seller or buyer in question has "reason to believe that such cattle shall be slaughtered" will be deemed as committing crime.

In fact, any perceived "abetment" of slaughter or attempt to slaughter will also be punishable under the new law. Clause 14 of the Bill clearly states that "whoever abets any offence punishable under the Act or attempts to commit any such offence" also attracts punishment. This clause leaves wide room for interpretation, and indeed misuse, on what exactly amounts to abetment.

Huge penalty
There is a huge difference in nature of punishment as well, with the Bill introducing a penalty clause (Clause 12 and 13) that did not exist in the earlier Act. It deems slaughter or "cause to slaughter" of cattle a "cognisable and non-bailable" offence triable by the court of Judicial Magistrate First Class. An offender may be imprisoned for a minimum of one year and for a maximum of seven years. The fine can range between Rs. 25,000 to Rs. 1 lakh.

Opening doors for what could eventually turn out to be privatisation of cattle protection, Clause 18 of the Bill says that the Government may direct associations and organisations to establish places to take care of cattle. It further says that the government "may levy such fees as may be prescribed for the maintenance of such institutions." This, in effect, could mean that a farmer is not only barred from selling a cow or buffalo that is past its prime, but that he may have to pay a fee to an institution to maintain it.

Some deletions
The Bill makes two deletions in the 1964 Act. It replaces the word "authorised persons" with "competent authority" and gives powers only to officers of the government to inspect or book cases. While the earlier Act, said that district judge was the last appellate authority, the law awaiting approval has removed this cap.

Cow slaughter ban bill passed in Karnataka Assembly Deccan Herald Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/58978/cow-slaughter-ban-bill-passed.html
news.outlookindia.com | Cow Slaughter Ban Bill Passed in K'taka Assembly Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?677285 
http://www.udayavani.com/showstory.asp?news=0&contentid=753542&lang=1 
Amid uproarious scenes, Karnataka Assembly today passed the controversial cow slaughter ban Bill, which provides for stringent punishment for violaters and makes the offence cognisable and non-bailable.

After more than a four-hour debate, the Bill was passed by voice-vote as the entire opposition -- Congress and JDS -- trooped into the well of the House and shouted anti-government slogans, branding the BJP government "communal".

Leader of Opposition Siddaramaiah, who termed the legislation "draconian", "anti-secular" and "unconstitutional" tore a copy of the the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010 -- and threw it in the air.

The bill prohibits slaughter of cattle, sale, usage and possession of beef, puts restriction on transport of cattle and also prohibits sale, purchase or disposal of cattle for slaughter.

The offence is punishable with imprisonment not less than one year which may extend up to seven years or fined between Rs 25,000 to Rs 50,000 or both; second and subsequent offence would attract a fine of not less than Rs 50,000 up to Rs one lakh along with imprisonment penalty.

The bill was intended to replace the Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Cattle Preservation Act, 1964, to prohibit the slaughter of cows and calves of she-buffaloes, bull, buffalo male or female.

The bill provides for stringent punishment for violation of the act, and also provides for powers to search and seizure of any premises including vessel or vehicle.

Home Minister V S Acharya said the bill was
"in tune with the sentiments of the majority community", as per the election manifesto of the BJP.

Siddaramaiah said such a bill can be enacted only in "Hitler's regime" and not in democracy. "Is yours a Hitler's regime?" he asked.

The BJP Government, he charged, was thrusting "vegetarian culture" on the people, adding, if the bill was passed, the price of mutton per kg would shoot up to Rs 1,000 from the present Rs 260 or so.

By this act, those dependent on the products such as shoes, leather, belts, nail polish, films, buttons and other beef products would lose their jobs. "You are making their life miserable", he said. As several opposition members flayed the bill in the debate that saw sparks fly, Siddaramaiah cautioned it would create "disturbance" in society and have an adverse impact on harmony.

JDS leader H D Revanna said the BJP brought the bill keeping in view its "vote bank".

Roshan Baig (Congress) expressed shock over the provision for a seven-year imprisonment in the act. "Don't try to implement hidden agenda", he told the BJP government, adding, the 1964 act was good enough.

Qamarul Islam (Congress) said the bill would create "hatred" among different communities, leading to "law and order problems". Several opposition members argued that poor eat beef as this meat is affordable and inexpensive at around Rs 60 per kg, compared to chicken and mutton. The choice should be left to the people, they said.

Cow slaughter bill passed in Karnataka - dnaindia.com Saturday, March 20, 2010 8:38 IST
http://www.dnaindia.com/bangalore/report_cow-slaughter-bill-passed-in-karnataka_1361144 
Srikanth Hunasavadi / DNA Sat, Mar 20, 2010
Bangalore: The much maligned and contentious cow slaughter bill was okayed on Friday by the legislative assembly amid dramatic scenes.

Even after more than four-and-a-half hours of discussion, the opposition demanded the withdrawal of the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, stating it was anti-people and anti-minority.

The opposition was apprehensive that a particular community was being targeted, and also feared harassment and corruption as more power would be vested with officials, especially the local sub-inspectors.

The bill stated that slaughter of a cow, calf, bull, bullock, buffalo was completely banned in the state. There was also prohibition of sale, usage and possession of beef and restriction on transport of cattle. It said a police official had the authority to search and seize cattle. The law provided for imprisonment from one year to seven years, with a fine of Rs25,000-Rs50,000.

Opposition party leader Siddaramaiah said, "The bill is against the secular character of the Constitution and it forces non-vegetarians to become vegetarians. It will impact cost of living and food problems will increase".

Anti-slaughter bill passed in Assembly Deccan Herald Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/58990/anti-slaughter-bill-passed-assembly.html
http://in.news.yahoo.com/20/20100319/1416/tnl-cow-slaughter-ban-bill-passed-in-kar.html 
The ruling BJP on Friday succeeded in pushing through the controversial cow slaughter ban bill in the Legislative Assembly amid dharna and slogan shouting by the Opposition parties.

Both the Opposition parties, the Congress and the JD(S), vehemently opposed the bill -- the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010 - and termed it as draconian.

However, Leader of the Opposition Siddaramaiah disagreed. "Only to harm a particular community, the bill has been tabled. It is anti-constitutional and anti-secularism," he alleged.

After a marathon debate for over five hours, the Speaker put the bill to voice vote and the House passed it.  Earlier, senior Congress leader T B Jayachandra alleged the provisions of the bill was anti-poor and anti-farmer and could also be misused for harassing people.

The members contented that it was not right to infringe upon the rights of the people. Further, the Government was under the impression that only members of a certain community consumed beef. In reality beef was preferred by the poor as it was available at a much cheaper rate than other meat.

Jayachandra said Section 5 of the Bill even prohibited possession of beef or beef products. "That means I cannot even buy imported canned beef and store it in my refrigerator. If I do that, I can be arrested. Is this not draconian," he asked.

Roshan Baig said several sections in the bill including power of search and seizure and restriction on transport of cattle could be misused to target the minorities. D K Shivakumar said thousands would be rendered unemployed following a ban of cow slaughter. Besides, leather industry would be severely hit.

The new bill among others enhances the penalty for contravention of the provisions of the 1964 Act from the present fine of Rs 1,000 and six months imprisonment, to a maximum fine of Rs 50,000 and seven years imprisonment. The Bill, however, couldn't receive the assent of the Council which was adjourned sine die.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill opposed The Hindu, Wednesday, March 10, 2010
http://www.thehindu.com/2010/03/10/stories/2010031062630600.htm

The Hindu : Front Page : Anti-cow slaughter Bill tabled The Hindu Wednesday, March 10, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/10/stories/2010031060200100.htm 
The Bill provides for stringent punishment for violation of the Act and also provides for powers for search and seizure of any premises as well as motor vehicles.

Karnataka govt re-introduces cow slaughter bill 
Tuesday, March 09, 2010, 20:24 IST
http://www.zeenews.com/news609849.html 
Bangalore: Within days after withdrawing it, the BJP government in Karnataka on Tuesday reintroduced in the assembly a bill banning cow slaughter amid protests and dharna by opposition Congress.

The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, was withdrawn only last week, without assigning any reason.

Pandemonium prevailed as Animal Husbandry Minister Revunaik Bilamagi rose to introduce the bill which was described by Siddaramaiah as "draconian", anti-poor, anti-Dalit and anti-backward classes, charging that BJP has hidden agenda.

The Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Preservation of Animals Act 1964 is already under implementation in the state and there was no need for a fresh Act, Siddaramaiah and Congress Deputy leader T B Jayachandra said.

"It is against the right and culture of a majority of people," Siddaramaiah said.

The new bill seeks to make offences under the proposed act a cognisable and non-bailable.

It also has severe punitive measures with imprisonment ranging from one year to seven years and fine from Rs 25,000 up to Rs one lakh.

The bill seeks to prohibit slaughter of cattle, possession of beef, sale and their transport.

http://dailypioneer.com/240977/Bedlam-in-Karnataka-over-Cow-Slaughter-Bill.html 
Wednesday, March 10, 2010
According to the proposed Bill, cow slaughter and transportation would attract imprisonment ranging from one year to seven years and fine from Rs 25,000 to Rs 1 lakh, depending on whether it's a first time cognisable offence or more than once.

The Bill also provides for stringent punishment for violation of the Act and powers to "search and seize" any premises which included "vessel or vehicle."

Ban on cow slaughter: MP flays govt move Times of India, Wed, Mar 24
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mysore/Ban-on-cow-slaughter-MP-flays-govt-move/articleshow/5716881.cms 
Mysore M P H Vishwanath on Tuesday came down heavily on the state government for passing a law banning cow slaughter in the state. He said this move of the BJP government is intended to suppress the rituals and eating habits of a section of people in the society.

He said whenever governments fail to deliver goods and take up welfare measures, they come up with such " nasty" ideas. Eating beef is a food habit of a section of people in the society including dalits and this cannot be curbed he said, questioning the Hindutva plank of the BJP.

Only Bovine is not Divine - Vikram Muthanna in Black & White - Star of Mysore
http://www.ourkarnataka.com/Articles/starofmysore/bovine009.htm 
But there was no protest when 50,000 sheep, nine buffaloes and thousands of chicken were sacrificed at a function that takes place with monotonous regularity in Davanagere. In fact, here, buffalo heads were chopped off in an undisclosed location (because it's illegal to slaughter and there were CCTVs at the original location) and paraded in front of one lakh people! And not too many people were taken aback by this century - old inhuman practice.

Oh! On the contrary our government will be prepared, after all there is a lot of money to be made when bans are violated and our governments are specialists in "collection".

Banning cow slaughter is going to send the practice underground and give birth to a new black market in which thugs, cops and govt. officers will thrive
.

Where are the cow lovers when cow owners leave their cows on the roads to eat plastic bags next to dustbins
? Where are these bovine fanatics when overloaded bullock carts are dragged by suffocating bullocks behind smoke-spewing tempos? Where are these saviours of holy cow when cows are overloaded into a lorry to be transported hundreds of miles without water?

If only the animal lovers could lobby for more effective implementation, then there would be happier cows in Indian homes instead of heartbreaking sights of unhappy bovines on our roads.

The cow may be sacred but what about pigs, goats, sheep, fish and chicken? They are god's creatures too. In fact in coastal areas fish is considered vegetarian!! How convenient. In a democracy, one community's wish cannot become the law for all. It is unfair and undemocratic.

Most farmers sell or give away young male calves as soon as they are born
. It seems in the animal world the 'girl child' is king.

Taking up the issue of just cow slaughter is only going to end up as a political game in which personal freedoms will be slaughtered and our Constitutional rights bloodied.

Send back anti-cow slaughter Bill The Hindu, Wed, March 24, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/24/stories/2010032460890500.htm
The Movement for the Protection of Indian Food Culture, a group of organisations which opposes the Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, on Monday urged Governor H.R. Bhardwaj not to give assent to the Bill. It termed the Bill as "anti-farmer, anti-Dalit and anti-minority" and demanded that the State Government withdraw it.

At a joint press meet here, vice-president of the Forum for Democracy and Communal Amity N.V. Narasimhaiah said that the Bill was opposed by the public and also elected representatives.

Despite this, the State Government had passed it rejecting the Opposition parties' appeal for voting on the Bill.

"The claim of the BJP Government that it had mandate to pass the Bill is far from truth.

The BJP has secured only 33.16 per cent of the vote in the Assembly elections which is lower than the Congress'.

"The Bill is an assault on the food habits of the majority of the people," he said.

Mr. Narasimhaiah said some provisions of the Bill are so "cruel" that farmers had not only been burdened but [they] also had to live in fear.

"The implementation of the Bill, which would affect one's profession, should receive the assent of the President. The State Government has violated this rule," he said.

Shivasundar of Karnataka Komu Souharda Vedike said that the punishment for violation of the Bill is equivalent to the one to be given to an anti-national element. Implementing the Bill may lead to communal disharmony, he feared.

The organisations have threatened to launch an agitation and continue it till the Bill was withdrawn
.

On Tuesday
, a delegation from the United Forum for Public Awareness met the Governor and urged him to withdraw the Bill.

The 15-member delegation, which submitted a memorandum, was led by convenor B.M. Yousuff Qureshi, State AHINDA president K. Mukudappa, MLA Roshan Baig and State president of the Dalit Sangharsh Samiti Lakshminarayana Nagawara.

Speaking to presspersons after the an hour-long meeting with the Governor, Mr. Mukudappa said that the delegation told the Governor that if the Bill is passed, it would affect the livelihood of farmers, traders dealing with livestock and those selling meat.

http://www.frontlineonnet.com/fl2708/stories/20100423270812100.htm 
Right-wing groups in the Karnatak State use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions.

This Bill proposes to ban completely the slaughter of cattle in Karnataka.

A section of the society sees this as an move by the Bharatiya Janata Party [BJP] government in the State against minorities and backward castes.

The Bill seems to be targeted at some/certain sections of the society. The government first introduced the Bill in the Assembly last year but withdrew it on March 3. However, it was reintroduced in a much more draconian form a few days later as the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill of 2010, which proposed to replace the Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Cattle Preservation Act of 1964.

There are two major differences between the two pieces of legislation. The latest Bill extends the prevention of slaughter to "cattle", which it defines as "cow, calf of a cow and bull, bullock, buffalo male or female and calf of she-buffalo". The 1964 Act had its scope restricted to the slaughter of cows, calves of cows and calves of she-buffaloes, but allowed the slaughter of bulls, bullocks and buffaloes if they were over 12 years of age or if they were no longer fit for breeding or draught or did not give milk.

The other difference is the severity of the penalty. The maximum imprisonment for violating the provisions of the 1964 Act was six months whereas the 2010 Bill prescribes imprisonment extending up to seven years. It is this that has made people question the intentions of the State BJP government as in the Indian Penal Code, imprisonment for such long terms is usually meant for crimes of a far more heinous nature.

Karnataka
, especially its coastal areas, has routinely been the target of right-wing groups who use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions. Skirmishes follow allegations of transporting of cows for slaughter.

In March 2005
, a 60-year-old man and his son were stripped, paraded and beaten in public for trying to buy a calf in Udupi district. In another incident in May 2006 in the same district, an elderly Hindu man was killed for being a middleman in the sale of cows.The involvement of fundamentalist organisations such as the Bajrang Dal and the Hindu Yuva Sena was alleged in both these incidents.

Right-wing groups in the State use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions.

Activist groups such as the Karnataka Komu Souharda Vedike (KKSV, or the Karnataka Communal Harmony Forum) feel that the harsh clauses of the 2010 Bill will be used to target religious minorities.

The Bill has come under the scanner for two other reasons. First, for its interference in the food habits of people - apart from the religious minorities, a large number of backward caste people consume beef.

Second, the excessive burden that the Bill will place on farmers, who will now have to look after their aged cattle instead of selling them off to meat traders.

Members of Dalit communities across the State have protested against the Bill, saying that it is a case of interference with their food habits.

The cow emerged as the rallying point for communal mobilisation in northern India in the late 19th century. It was the reason for riots on several occasions in pre-independent and post-independent India.

When the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) was in power at the Centre, it had tried to introduce the 'Prevention of Cruelty to Cow Bill' in 2003 but its efforts failed as it could not build a consensus on the issue. While most States across India have banned the slaughter of cows but not other cattle, it is legal to slaughter cows in Kerala, West Bengal and in the north-eastern States.

If the Bill becomes an Act and the sale of beef is completely forbidden in the State, it will be the responsibility of the State government to provide for the upkeep of lakhs of head of cattle. This will increase the burden on the State exchequer.

The ban will also bring about a change in the dietary habits of lakhs of people. Beef is relatively cheap, selling at between Rs.100 and Rs.120 in Bangalore, while mutton sells at double that price. The BJP government has not given a thought to this or to the livelihood problem of lakhs of people involved in the cattle meat trade while attempting to appease its right-wing constituency.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill will lead to milk shortage The Hindu
http://www.hindu.com/2010/06/17/stories/2010061752210400.htm Yeddyurappa accused of trying to polarise society
Jnanpith awardee U.R. Ananthamurthy warned the Bharatiya Janata Party Government that the controversial anti-cow slaughter Bill, if implemented, would discourage farmers from rearing cattle and lead to a shortage of milk.

Mr. Ananthamurthy said the piece of legislation, which had been passed in the Assembly, was "communal in intent and anti-farmer in consequence".

Playwright Girish Karnad said he opposed the Bill as it deprived citizens the freedom to choose their food.

"As long as their choice of food is not affecting others, why should its (the food) consumption been prohibited?" Mr Karnad sought to know.

The former MLC A.K. Subbaiah accused Mr. Yeddyurappa of trying to polarise the majority and minority communities through the Bill in an attempt to "permanently" cling to power. Mr. Subbaiah said the goshalas, where the aged cattle are meant to be provided care, would become exporting units for beef and cited how Gujarat, where such a law already exists, was a leading beef exporter in the country.

http://www.tehelka.com/story_main45.asp?filename=Ne100710holycow.asp
HOLIER THAN THE COW
Karnataka plans to criminalise possession of beef and restrict transport of cattle. But isn't this an attack on secularism? - By Sanjana of tehelka.com
The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill 2010, if enacted, will impose a blanket ban on slaughter of cattle in the state.

Karnataka, like several other states in the country, has always had an Act that puts restrictions on the slaughter of cows. The existing legislation allows cows to be sold to slaughterhouses if they are over 12 years of age - by when they stop producing milk. Before the sale, cows have to be mandatorily certified by qualified veterinary doctors. The proposed legislation is a significant departure from the existing Act on several counts.

By expanding the definition of cattle to include "a cow, calf, bull, bullock, buffalo", the government proposes to ban beef completely. Further, the legislation proposes to criminalise the act of possession of beef and imposes severe restrictions on even the transport of cattle. Offenders can be imprisoned for a period of one to seven years, or fined Rs 25,000-50,000. Yet another significant departure in the legislation is the power that it accords to non-state actors - they are authorised to raid premises on mere suspicion.

For Dalits, Muslims, Christians and several other communities, consumption of beef is part of regular diet. What should draw our attention is that a democratically elected government that is bound by secular constitutional values is willing to criminalise cultural habits of millions of people to uphold the religious beliefs of a few. Neither is the matter one of headcount - if it were, Dalits, Muslims and Christians in the state are sure to outnumber those who are opposed to slaughter of cattle. It is about drawing the lines - us and them, the beef-eaters and those who don't, the killers and the pious ones. And reinforcing those lines with the power of the State behind one section.

Outside the realm of cultural, religious and communal notions lies a purely economic one as well. A rally in Bengaluru to protest against the Bill saw 10,000 people warning the government of further unrest if the legislation went through. A large section of the crowd were farmers for whom the legislation would spell economic doom. Cattle that was unproductive and that could not be sold to slaughterhouses would be an economic burden they could not bear. To say nothing of the people who survive on the fringes of the slaughterhouses.

What is definite is that the line in the Preamble to the Indian Constitution, where we promise ourself a secular Indian republic, will be read in a softer voice.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/77103/public-stop-implementation-cow-slaughter.html 
Implementation of Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill 2010 will be stopped through people's movement, said former MLA A K Subbaiah.
Speaking at a protest meeting against the ban on cow slaughter here on Wednesday, he said "if the society wakes up from its deep slumber, then government will fly like dry leaves. No government has the ability to stand in front of the people's power in this democracy."

"Ban on cow slaughter is anti-constitutional. As per Article 48 of the Indian Constitution, unused cow can be slaughtered."

Subbaiah said  "there are around 6,000 castes in the country. Of which, 40 per cent of them consume beef. The BJP has been propagating that the cow slaughter is hurting the sentiments of Hindus. Let them announce that all those who consume beef are not Hindus."

Karnataka Komu Sauharda Vedike Convener K L Ashok said that the Vedike is ready to go for breach of law if the Bill is implemented in the state. "At the same time, we will hold protest in front of Vidhan Soudha by consuming beef."

"The Bill is anti-Dalit and minorities. If the government goes ahead with the implementation of the Bill, then it will script for a new mutiny in the State," he warned.

Kodagu Zilla Panchayat member V P Shashidhar said, "In Nagaland, people consume dog meat. No government has the right to take away right for food. BJP government is carrying out dictatorship."

Communist Party of India (Marxist) District Secretary Dr I R Durgaprasad said "BJP government is introducing the Bill to give mental and physical torture to Muslims. The Bill will put farmers to hardship."

Muslim Pragathipara Chintakara Vedike President K M Kunhi Abdulla said "by implementing the Bill, government is planning to make backward, minorities and farmers as its slaves."

Protest against cow-slaughter attracts people in huge numbers
- Times of India
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mangalore/Protest-against-cow-slaughter-attracts-people-in-huge-numbers/articleshow/6034226.cms 
The former MLC and Congress leader A K Subbaiah, who inaugurated the rally, voiced his opinion saying that this bill was just a move by the State government to appease the priestly class. This is also done with an intention to rob the Muslims of their livelihood, he alleged. In Karnataka, only Muslims are involved in beef trade and if cow slaughtering is completely banned, it will affect the economic condition of many of the Muslims, he contended.

Subbaiah observed that the State Government also does not realize how detrimental this move will be for farmers, who do not have the wherewithal to take care of cows that will not help them in their occupation.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill criticised
- The Hindu
Government cannot dictate terms on food habits of people
Describing the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill introduced by the Bharatiya Janata Party government as an attack on the food habits of the people, general secretary of the Karnataka Rajya Raitha Sangha Veera Sangaiah said on Saturday that the implementation of this law would destroy agriculture in the State.

He was speaking at a protest meeting organised by various organisation under the banner of Januvaru Hatya Nishedha Masude Virodhi Okkoota in front of the Deputy Commissioner's office in Udupi.

Mr. Sangaiah said that as per the Bill, farmers would have to leave their old or injured cattle at 'goshalas' and pay for their upkeep every month.

Farmers in the State were committing suicide because they were unable to repay loans.

It would be difficult for them to pay for the upkeep of these cattle. Under the Bill, it was a crime to kill the cattle. The Government had forgotten that a large number of people consumed beef, Mr. Sangaiah said. State convener of the Karnataka Rajya Dalit Sangharsh Samiti N. Venkatesh said that the Government could not dictate terms on the food habits of the people.

The former MLC, L. Hanumanthaiah, said, farmers who work in the fields with cattle had not demanded any law to ban cow slaughter.

Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill is unconstitutional -
Deccan Herald
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/59521/anti-cow-slaughter-bill-unconstitutional.html 
The controversial Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter And Preservation Of Cattle Bill 2010 which aims to bring about a blanket ban on slaughter of milch animals and draught cattle is unconstitutional, said former MP Janardhan Poojary.

Addressing a press meet here on Monday, he said the move of the state government has violated four earlier judgements of Supreme Court on cow slaughter. The existing Prevention Of Cow Slaughter And Cattle Preservation Act, 1964 has been repealed to get this Bill accepted in the Assembly.

He said as per the definition of cattle in the proposed Act now includes bull, bullock and buffalo. Slaughter of cattle has been made a non-bailable offence, punishable with imprisonment ranging between one and seven years, which is unconstitutional. The Bill is draconian.

He said "the Bill should not have been allowed to table in the Assembly. The Bill is anti-farmer. Whether Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa will pay for the daily expenses of these aged cattle. The farmer is forced to keep the cattle with himself till it dies, which will be an additional burden on him."

Poojary alleged that Chief Minister has not respected the Supreme Court's judgement. We have given power to a person who does not value the judgement of the Supreme Court, he observed.  He feared that the Bill can be misused by people to take personal revenge. "CM will learn a lesson when the Bill is misused against him. The Bill was directly targeting minorities and Dalits," he alleged. The Bill was nothing but an agenda of the RSS and Sangh Parivar.

He urged the Chief Minister to withdraw the draconian Bill and continue with the existing Act of 1964.  He challenged CM to issue a statement that he (CM) is ready to violate the verdicts of Supreme Court and get the Bill implemented in the State.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill tabled in Council The Hindu Friday July 09 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/07/09/stories/2010070951180400.htm
The Opposition members termed the Bill as "anti-farmer" and "anti-poor." Leader of the Opposition Motamma remarked: "Let the people of the State know that you have more love towards cattle than people."

Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill infringes on rights - Deccan Herald
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/63209/anti-cow-slaughter-bill-infringes.html

Transparency International (Karnataka) Chairman Justice Saldanha termed the Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill as something infringed upon the basic fundamental rights of people as guaranteed in the constitution.

He was speaking at a seminar at the St Marks Cathedral on Saturday. "The Bill is highly discriminatory as it targeted food habits of the most vulnerable and the weaker sections and minorities," he said.

Things could take a dangerous turn as the Bill empowered the police to barge inside any house on the slightest suspicion of possessing cattle. "With the power wielded by the police, it can prove disastrous as the onus of proving the innocence is on the accused," he noted.

Echoing similar views, former MLA, Sriram Reddy said the more than 25 per cent population depended on the milk business to eak out a living. "Most of the cows that give milk last four to five years. With the government making it illegal to sell cows, the onus of maintenance will completely shift to the poor farmers and agriculturist. It would be a big burden on them", he added.

Slaughter Bill: Governor raps government
Deccan Chronicle Jun 20 2010
http://www.deccanchronicle.com/bengaluru/slaughter-bill-governor-raps-government-893 
There seems to be no end to the cold war between Governor HR Bhardwaj and the BJP government in the state. Mr Bhardwaj on Saturday snubbed the government yet again on the controversial anti-cow slaughter Bill and expressed his reservations over the proposed bill, which was passed by the Assembly in March this year. The Bill has to be sent to Raj Bhavan for final ratification.

Lashing out at the Yeddyurappa government for spreading rumours that he had okayed the Bill, Mr Bhardwaj alleged that the news was fabricated. "In fact, I have my own reservations about the Bill. Personally, I am not happy with it. The Bill is still with the Upper House. I will look into it when it reaches me," he said. The Governor said that he was upset with animal husbandry minister Revunaik Belamagi, who used the media for spreading 'fabricated news.' "The priority will be to maintain communal harmony in the state," he said.

The Bill bans slaughter of cattle and sale and use of beef. The offence is punishable with imprisonment not less than one year.
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This petition's been addressed to the Hon'ble Supreme Court, President, Prime Minister or PM, National Human Rights Commission or NHRC, Karnataka State Human Rights Commission or SHRC, National Commission for Minorities or NCM, Karnataka Governor/Guv, Karnataka Chief Minister or CM & Union Law Ministry.

Last Update: Saturday, July 10, 2010 @ 11:20 hrs Indian Std. Time
Scrap the draconian Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill / Act 2010
http://www.petitiononline.com/cattleka/
http://www.petitiononline.com/straycow/
Anti-cow slaughter Bill passed amid dharna The Hindu Friday, July 16, 2010
Anti-cow slaughter Bill passed amid dharna The Hindu Fri, Jul 16, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/07/16/stories/2010071651740400.htm
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/57592/holy-cow.html
Holy cow! Deccan Herald Editorial dated Friday, March 12, 2010
The bill will act as a spur to vigilante groups.
The Yeddyurappa ministry's move to come back to the Assembly with the bill banning cow slaughter
, within days of introducing and withdrawing it, indicates muddle-headed thinking in the government. If it was assumed that wisdom had dawned on the government in the light of allround criticism over the bill, such hopes seem to have been misplaced. The bill that was tabled in the Lower House on Wednesday is a piece of legislation that was completely unnecessary, as a similar law is in force since 1964. If that law did not prove effective, the problem was with the implementation and not the law itself. The statement of objective and reasons attached to the proposed bill do not even pretend to make out a case for it.

The law virtually equates the killing of a cow with the murder of a human
, and appears to have been inspired by the Indian Wildlife Act, 1972. The latter was a law that banned hunting and poaching of wild animals for food or profit and proved crucially important in arresting poaching to a great extent. The bill in question, on the other hand, seems to have no other purpose than challenging the food habits and rights of a section of the population, since it does not mention ritualistic killing of cattle, notably buffalos that goes on with impunity in temples across Karnataka.

If the law indeed had the objective of 'preservation and improvement of the breeds of cattle,' the government would have come out with plans to revive the magnificent breeds of Indian cattle such as Hallikar, Ongole, Amrithamahal and so on instead of merely trying to hand over veterinary farms to organisations of dubious background. Section 18 that provides for 'Establishment of institutions for taking care of cattle' deepens the suspicion that the bill is less about the welfare of cattle and more about an agenda that is all too familiar.

But what is most worrisome about the bill are the penalties that it provides for
. They are draconian and are open to misinterpretation and misuse. Worse, the bill will strengthen the hands of vigilante groups in certain parts of the state that have been targeting minorities under the guise of protecting cattle. Many such groups are little more than mafia gangs that sport the facade of religion to prey on certain communities. The BJP government will do well to put the bill in cold storage and concentrate on development works.

New anti-cow slaughter law will mean total ban and heavy fine The Hindu, Friday, March 19, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/19/stories/2010031962240700.htm 
Bageshree S.
The Bill makes slaughter of all forms of cattle a punishable crime
Clause 5 prohibits 'usage and possession of beef'
The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter And Preservation Of Cattle Bill, 2010, - which was tabled in the legislature this session despite strong protests and is now awaiting passage - makes significant departures from the Karnataka Prevention Of Cow Slaughter And Cattle Preservation Act, 1964, starting with the very definition of the word "cattle".

As the very title suggests, the Bill removes any distinction between "cow" and "cattle" and makes slaughter of all forms of cattle - including he and she buffaloes - a punishable crime. Slaughter of any cattle, irrespective of its age, will be deemed a crime if the Bill replaces the Act.

Total ban
Going a step ahead, Clause 5 prohibits not only slaughter, but also "usage and possession of beef" which would practically mean a complete ban on beef eating. Clause 8 states that not only slaughter, but "sale, purchase or disposal of cattle for slaughter" when the seller or buyer in question has "reason to believe that such cattle shall be slaughtered" will be deemed as committing crime.

In fact, any perceived "abetment" of slaughter or attempt to slaughter will also be punishable under the new law. Clause 14 of the Bill clearly states that "whoever abets any offence punishable under the Act or attempts to commit any such offence" also attracts punishment. This clause leaves wide room for interpretation, and indeed misuse, on what exactly amounts to abetment.

Huge penalty
There is a huge difference in nature of punishment as well, with the Bill introducing a penalty clause (Clause 12 and 13) that did not exist in the earlier Act. It deems slaughter or "cause to slaughter" of cattle a "cognisable and non-bailable" offence triable by the court of Judicial Magistrate First Class. An offender may be imprisoned for a minimum of one year and for a maximum of seven years. The fine can range between Rs. 25,000 to Rs. 1 lakh.

Opening doors for what could eventually turn out to be privatisation of cattle protection, Clause 18 of the Bill says that the Government may direct associations and organisations to establish places to take care of cattle. It further says that the government "may levy such fees as may be prescribed for the maintenance of such institutions." This, in effect, could mean that a farmer is not only barred from selling a cow or buffalo that is past its prime, but that he may have to pay a fee to an institution to maintain it.

Some deletions
The Bill makes two deletions in the 1964 Act. It replaces the word "authorised persons" with "competent authority" and gives powers only to officers of the government to inspect or book cases. While the earlier Act, said that district judge was the last appellate authority, the law awaiting approval has removed this cap.

Cow slaughter ban bill passed in Karnataka Assembly Deccan Herald Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/58978/cow-slaughter-ban-bill-passed.html
news.outlookindia.com | Cow Slaughter Ban Bill Passed in K'taka Assembly Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?677285 
http://www.udayavani.com/showstory.asp?news=0&contentid=753542&lang=1 
Amid uproarious scenes, Karnataka Assembly today passed the controversial cow slaughter ban Bill, which provides for stringent punishment for violaters and makes the offence cognisable and non-bailable.

After more than a four-hour debate, the Bill was passed by voice-vote as the entire opposition -- Congress and JDS -- trooped into the well of the House and shouted anti-government slogans, branding the BJP government "communal".

Leader of Opposition Siddaramaiah, who termed the legislation "draconian", "anti-secular" and "unconstitutional" tore a copy of the the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010 -- and threw it in the air.

The bill prohibits slaughter of cattle, sale, usage and possession of beef, puts restriction on transport of cattle and also prohibits sale, purchase or disposal of cattle for slaughter.

The offence is punishable with imprisonment not less than one year which may extend up to seven years or fined between Rs 25,000 to Rs 50,000 or both; second and subsequent offence would attract a fine of not less than Rs 50,000 up to Rs one lakh along with imprisonment penalty.

The bill was intended to replace the Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Cattle Preservation Act, 1964, to prohibit the slaughter of cows and calves of she-buffaloes, bull, buffalo male or female.

The bill provides for stringent punishment for violation of the act, and also provides for powers to search and seizure of any premises including vessel or vehicle.

Home Minister V S Acharya said the bill was
"in tune with the sentiments of the majority community", as per the election manifesto of the BJP.

Siddaramaiah said such a bill can be enacted only in "Hitler's regime" and not in democracy. "Is yours a Hitler's regime?" he asked.

The BJP Government, he charged, was thrusting "vegetarian culture" on the people, adding, if the bill was passed, the price of mutton per kg would shoot up to Rs 1,000 from the present Rs 260 or so.

By this act, those dependent on the products such as shoes, leather, belts, nail polish, films, buttons and other beef products would lose their jobs. "You are making their life miserable", he said. As several opposition members flayed the bill in the debate that saw sparks fly, Siddaramaiah cautioned it would create "disturbance" in society and have an adverse impact on harmony.

JDS leader H D Revanna said the BJP brought the bill keeping in view its "vote bank".

Roshan Baig (Congress) expressed shock over the provision for a seven-year imprisonment in the act. "Don't try to implement hidden agenda", he told the BJP government, adding, the 1964 act was good enough.

Qamarul Islam (Congress) said the bill would create "hatred" among different communities, leading to "law and order problems". Several opposition members argued that poor eat beef as this meat is affordable and inexpensive at around Rs 60 per kg, compared to chicken and mutton. The choice should be left to the people, they said.

Cow slaughter bill passed in Karnataka - dnaindia.com Saturday, March 20, 2010 8:38 IST
http://www.dnaindia.com/bangalore/report_cow-slaughter-bill-passed-in-karnataka_1361144 
Srikanth Hunasavadi / DNA Sat, Mar 20, 2010
Bangalore: The much maligned and contentious cow slaughter bill was okayed on Friday by the legislative assembly amid dramatic scenes.

Even after more than four-and-a-half hours of discussion, the opposition demanded the withdrawal of the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, stating it was anti-people and anti-minority.

The opposition was apprehensive that a particular community was being targeted, and also feared harassment and corruption as more power would be vested with officials, especially the local sub-inspectors.

The bill stated that slaughter of a cow, calf, bull, bullock, buffalo was completely banned in the state. There was also prohibition of sale, usage and possession of beef and restriction on transport of cattle. It said a police official had the authority to search and seize cattle. The law provided for imprisonment from one year to seven years, with a fine of Rs25,000-Rs50,000.

Opposition party leader Siddaramaiah said, "The bill is against the secular character of the Constitution and it forces non-vegetarians to become vegetarians. It will impact cost of living and food problems will increase".

Anti-slaughter bill passed in Assembly Deccan Herald Saturday, March 20, 2010
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/58990/anti-slaughter-bill-passed-assembly.html
http://in.news.yahoo.com/20/20100319/1416/tnl-cow-slaughter-ban-bill-passed-in-kar.html 
The ruling BJP on Friday succeeded in pushing through the controversial cow slaughter ban bill in the Legislative Assembly amid dharna and slogan shouting by the Opposition parties.

Both the Opposition parties, the Congress and the JD(S), vehemently opposed the bill -- the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010 - and termed it as draconian.

However, Leader of the Opposition Siddaramaiah disagreed. "Only to harm a particular community, the bill has been tabled. It is anti-constitutional and anti-secularism," he alleged.

After a marathon debate for over five hours, the Speaker put the bill to voice vote and the House passed it.  Earlier, senior Congress leader T B Jayachandra alleged the provisions of the bill was anti-poor and anti-farmer and could also be misused for harassing people.

The members contented that it was not right to infringe upon the rights of the people. Further, the Government was under the impression that only members of a certain community consumed beef. In reality beef was preferred by the poor as it was available at a much cheaper rate than other meat.

Jayachandra said Section 5 of the Bill even prohibited possession of beef or beef products. "That means I cannot even buy imported canned beef and store it in my refrigerator. If I do that, I can be arrested. Is this not draconian," he asked.

Roshan Baig said several sections in the bill including power of search and seizure and restriction on transport of cattle could be misused to target the minorities. D K Shivakumar said thousands would be rendered unemployed following a ban of cow slaughter. Besides, leather industry would be severely hit.

The new bill among others enhances the penalty for contravention of the provisions of the 1964 Act from the present fine of Rs 1,000 and six months imprisonment, to a maximum fine of Rs 50,000 and seven years imprisonment. The Bill, however, couldn't receive the assent of the Council which was adjourned sine die.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill opposed The Hindu, Wednesday, March 10, 2010
http://www.thehindu.com/2010/03/10/stories/2010031062630600.htm

The Hindu : Front Page : Anti-cow slaughter Bill tabled The Hindu Wednesday, March 10, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/10/stories/2010031060200100.htm 
The Bill provides for stringent punishment for violation of the Act and also provides for powers for search and seizure of any premises as well as motor vehicles.

Karnataka govt re-introduces cow slaughter bill 
Tuesday, March 09, 2010, 20:24 IST
http://www.zeenews.com/news609849.html 
Bangalore: Within days after withdrawing it, the BJP government in Karnataka on Tuesday reintroduced in the assembly a bill banning cow slaughter amid protests and dharna by opposition Congress.

The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, was withdrawn only last week, without assigning any reason.

Pandemonium prevailed as Animal Husbandry Minister Revunaik Bilamagi rose to introduce the bill which was described by Siddaramaiah as "draconian", anti-poor, anti-Dalit and anti-backward classes, charging that BJP has hidden agenda.

The Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Preservation of Animals Act 1964 is already under implementation in the state and there was no need for a fresh Act, Siddaramaiah and Congress Deputy leader T B Jayachandra said.

"It is against the right and culture of a majority of people," Siddaramaiah said.

The new bill seeks to make offences under the proposed act a cognisable and non-bailable.

It also has severe punitive measures with imprisonment ranging from one year to seven years and fine from Rs 25,000 up to Rs one lakh.

The bill seeks to prohibit slaughter of cattle, possession of beef, sale and their transport.

http://dailypioneer.com/240977/Bedlam-in-Karnataka-over-Cow-Slaughter-Bill.html 
Wednesday, March 10, 2010
According to the proposed Bill, cow slaughter and transportation would attract imprisonment ranging from one year to seven years and fine from Rs 25,000 to Rs 1 lakh, depending on whether it's a first time cognisable offence or more than once.

The Bill also provides for stringent punishment for violation of the Act and powers to "search and seize" any premises which included "vessel or vehicle."

Ban on cow slaughter: MP flays govt move Times of India, Wed, Mar 24
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mysore/Ban-on-cow-slaughter-MP-flays-govt-move/articleshow/5716881.cms 
Mysore M P H Vishwanath on Tuesday came down heavily on the state government for passing a law banning cow slaughter in the state. He said this move of the BJP government is intended to suppress the rituals and eating habits of a section of people in the society.

He said whenever governments fail to deliver goods and take up welfare measures, they come up with such " nasty" ideas. Eating beef is a food habit of a section of people in the society including dalits and this cannot be curbed he said, questioning the Hindutva plank of the BJP.

Only Bovine is not Divine - Vikram Muthanna in Black & White - Star of Mysore
http://www.ourkarnataka.com/Articles/starofmysore/bovine009.htm 
But there was no protest when 50,000 sheep, nine buffaloes and thousands of chicken were sacrificed at a function that takes place with monotonous regularity in Davanagere. In fact, here, buffalo heads were chopped off in an undisclosed location (because it's illegal to slaughter and there were CCTVs at the original location) and paraded in front of one lakh people! And not too many people were taken aback by this century - old inhuman practice.

Oh! On the contrary our government will be prepared, after all there is a lot of money to be made when bans are violated and our governments are specialists in "collection".

Banning cow slaughter is going to send the practice underground and give birth to a new black market in which thugs, cops and govt. officers will thrive
.

Where are the cow lovers when cow owners leave their cows on the roads to eat plastic bags next to dustbins
? Where are these bovine fanatics when overloaded bullock carts are dragged by suffocating bullocks behind smoke-spewing tempos? Where are these saviours of holy cow when cows are overloaded into a lorry to be transported hundreds of miles without water?

If only the animal lovers could lobby for more effective implementation, then there would be happier cows in Indian homes instead of heartbreaking sights of unhappy bovines on our roads.

The cow may be sacred but what about pigs, goats, sheep, fish and chicken? They are god's creatures too. In fact in coastal areas fish is considered vegetarian!! How convenient. In a democracy, one community's wish cannot become the law for all. It is unfair and undemocratic.

Most farmers sell or give away young male calves as soon as they are born
. It seems in the animal world the 'girl child' is king.

Taking up the issue of just cow slaughter is only going to end up as a political game in which personal freedoms will be slaughtered and our Constitutional rights bloodied.

Send back anti-cow slaughter Bill The Hindu, Wed, March 24, 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/03/24/stories/2010032460890500.htm
The Movement for the Protection of Indian Food Culture, a group of organisations which opposes the Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill, 2010, on Monday urged Governor H.R. Bhardwaj not to give assent to the Bill. It termed the Bill as "anti-farmer, anti-Dalit and anti-minority" and demanded that the State Government withdraw it.

At a joint press meet here, vice-president of the Forum for Democracy and Communal Amity N.V. Narasimhaiah said that the Bill was opposed by the public and also elected representatives.

Despite this, the State Government had passed it rejecting the Opposition parties' appeal for voting on the Bill.

"The claim of the BJP Government that it had mandate to pass the Bill is far from truth.

The BJP has secured only 33.16 per cent of the vote in the Assembly elections which is lower than the Congress'.

"The Bill is an assault on the food habits of the majority of the people," he said.

Mr. Narasimhaiah said some provisions of the Bill are so "cruel" that farmers had not only been burdened but [they] also had to live in fear.

"The implementation of the Bill, which would affect one's profession, should receive the assent of the President. The State Government has violated this rule," he said.

Shivasundar of Karnataka Komu Souharda Vedike said that the punishment for violation of the Bill is equivalent to the one to be given to an anti-national element. Implementing the Bill may lead to communal disharmony, he feared.

The organisations have threatened to launch an agitation and continue it till the Bill was withdrawn
.

On Tuesday
, a delegation from the United Forum for Public Awareness met the Governor and urged him to withdraw the Bill.

The 15-member delegation, which submitted a memorandum, was led by convenor B.M. Yousuff Qureshi, State AHINDA president K. Mukudappa, MLA Roshan Baig and State president of the Dalit Sangharsh Samiti Lakshminarayana Nagawara.

Speaking to presspersons after the an hour-long meeting with the Governor, Mr. Mukudappa said that the delegation told the Governor that if the Bill is passed, it would affect the livelihood of farmers, traders dealing with livestock and those selling meat.

http://www.frontlineonnet.com/fl2708/stories/20100423270812100.htm 
Right-wing groups in the Karnatak State use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions.

This Bill proposes to ban completely the slaughter of cattle in Karnataka.


A section of the society sees this as an move by the Bharatiya Janata Party [BJP] government in the State against minorities and backward castes.

The Bill seems to be targeted at some/certain sections of the society. The government first introduced the Bill in the Assembly last year but withdrew it on March 3. However, it was reintroduced in a much more draconian form a few days later as the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill of 2010, which proposed to replace the Karnataka Prevention of Cow Slaughter and Cattle Preservation Act of 1964.

There are two major differences between the two pieces of legislation. The latest Bill extends the prevention of slaughter to "cattle", which it defines as "cow, calf of a cow and bull, bullock, buffalo male or female and calf of she-buffalo". The 1964 Act had its scope restricted to the slaughter of cows, calves of cows and calves of she-buffaloes, but allowed the slaughter of bulls, bullocks and buffaloes if they were over 12 years of age or if they were no longer fit for breeding or draught or did not give milk.

The other difference is the severity of the penalty. The maximum imprisonment for violating the provisions of the 1964 Act was six months whereas the 2010 Bill prescribes imprisonment extending up to seven years. It is this that has made people question the intentions of the State BJP government as in the Indian Penal Code, imprisonment for such long terms is usually meant for crimes of a far more heinous nature.

Karnataka
, especially its coastal areas, has routinely been the target of right-wing groups who use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions. Skirmishes follow allegations of transporting of cows for slaughter.

In March 2005
, a 60-year-old man and his son were stripped, paraded and beaten in public for trying to buy a calf in Udupi district. In another incident in May 2006 in the same district, an elderly Hindu man was killed for being a middleman in the sale of cows.The involvement of fundamentalist organisations such as the Bajrang Dal and the Hindu Yuva Sena was alleged in both these incidents.

Right-wing groups in the State use the cow slaughter issue to create communal tensions.

Activist groups such as the Karnataka Komu Souharda Vedike (KKSV, or the Karnataka Communal Harmony Forum) feel that the harsh clauses of the 2010 Bill will be used to target religious minorities.

The Bill has come under the scanner for two other reasons. First, for its interference in the food habits of people - apart from the religious minorities, a large number of backward caste people consume beef.

Second, the excessive burden that the Bill will place on farmers, who will now have to look after their aged cattle instead of selling them off to meat traders.

Members of Dalit communities across the State have protested against the Bill, saying that it is a case of interference with their food habits.

The cow emerged as the rallying point for communal mobilisation in northern India in the late 19th century. It was the reason for riots on several occasions in pre-independent and post-independent India.

When the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) was in power at the Centre, it had tried to introduce the 'Prevention of Cruelty to Cow Bill' in 2003 but its efforts failed as it could not build a consensus on the issue. While most States across India have banned the slaughter of cows but not other cattle, it is legal to slaughter cows in Kerala, West Bengal and in the north-eastern States.

If the Bill becomes an Act and the sale of beef is completely forbidden in the State, it will be the responsibility of the State government to provide for the upkeep of lakhs of head of cattle. This will increase the burden on the State exchequer.

The ban will also bring about a change in the dietary habits of lakhs of people. Beef is relatively cheap, selling at between Rs.100 and Rs.120 in Bangalore, while mutton sells at double that price. The BJP government has not given a thought to this or to the livelihood problem of lakhs of people involved in the cattle meat trade while attempting to appease its right-wing constituency.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill will lead to milk shortage The Hindu
http://www.hindu.com/2010/06/17/stories/2010061752210400.htm Yeddyurappa accused of trying to polarise society
Jnanpith awardee U.R. Ananthamurthy warned the Bharatiya Janata Party Government that the controversial anti-cow slaughter Bill, if implemented, would discourage farmers from rearing cattle and lead to a shortage of milk.

Mr. Ananthamurthy said the piece of legislation, which had been passed in the Assembly, was "communal in intent and anti-farmer in consequence".


Playwright Girish Karnad said he opposed the Bill as it deprived citizens the freedom to choose their food.

"As long as their choice of food is not affecting others, why should its (the food) consumption been prohibited?" Mr Karnad sought to know.

The former MLC A.K. Subbaiah accused Mr. Yeddyurappa of trying to polarise the majority and minority communities through the Bill in an attempt to "permanently" cling to power. Mr. Subbaiah said the goshalas, where the aged cattle are meant to be provided care, would become exporting units for beef and cited how Gujarat, where such a law already exists, was a leading beef exporter in the country.

http://www.tehelka.com/story_main45.asp?filename=Ne100710holycow.asp
HOLIER THAN THE COW
Karnataka plans to criminalise possession of beef and restrict transport of cattle. But isn't this an attack on secularism? - By Sanjana of tehelka.com
The Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill 2010, if enacted, will impose a blanket ban on slaughter of cattle in the state.

Karnataka, like several other states in the country, has always had an Act that puts restrictions on the slaughter of cows. The existing legislation allows cows to be sold to slaughterhouses if they are over 12 years of age - by when they stop producing milk. Before the sale, cows have to be mandatorily certified by qualified veterinary doctors. The proposed legislation is a significant departure from the existing Act on several counts.

By expanding the definition of cattle to include "a cow, calf, bull, bullock, buffalo", the government proposes to ban beef completely. Further, the legislation proposes to criminalise the act of possession of beef and imposes severe restrictions on even the transport of cattle. Offenders can be imprisoned for a period of one to seven years, or fined Rs 25,000-50,000. Yet another significant departure in the legislation is the power that it accords to non-state actors - they are authorised to raid premises on mere suspicion.

For Dalits, Muslims, Christians and several other communities, consumption of beef is part of regular diet. What should draw our attention is that a democratically elected government that is bound by secular constitutional values is willing to criminalise cultural habits of millions of people to uphold the religious beliefs of a few. Neither is the matter one of headcount - if it were, Dalits, Muslims and Christians in the state are sure to outnumber those who are opposed to slaughter of cattle. It is about drawing the lines - us and them, the beef-eaters and those who don't, the killers and the pious ones. And reinforcing those lines with the power of the State behind one section.

Outside the realm of cultural, religious and communal notions lies a purely economic one as well. A rally in Bengaluru to protest against the Bill saw 10,000 people warning the government of further unrest if the legislation went through. A large section of the crowd were farmers for whom the legislation would spell economic doom. Cattle that was unproductive and that could not be sold to slaughterhouses would be an economic burden they could not bear. To say nothing of the people who survive on the fringes of the slaughterhouses.

What is definite is that the line in the Preamble to the Indian Constitution, where we promise ourself a secular Indian republic, will be read in a softer voice.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/77103/public-stop-implementation-cow-slaughter.html 
Implementation of Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill 2010 will be stopped through people's movement, said former MLA A K Subbaiah.
Speaking at a protest meeting against the ban on cow slaughter here on Wednesday, he said "if the society wakes up from its deep slumber, then government will fly like dry leaves. No government has the ability to stand in front of the people's power in this democracy."

"Ban on cow slaughter is anti-constitutional. As per Article 48 of the Indian Constitution, unused cow can be slaughtered."

Subbaiah said  "there are around 6,000 castes in the country. Of which, 40 per cent of them consume beef. The BJP has been propagating that the cow slaughter is hurting the sentiments of Hindus. Let them announce that all those who consume beef are not Hindus."

Karnataka Komu Sauharda Vedike Convener K L Ashok said that the Vedike is ready to go for breach of law if the Bill is implemented in the state. "At the same time, we will hold protest in front of Vidhan Soudha by consuming beef."

"The Bill is anti-Dalit and minorities. If the government goes ahead with the implementation of the Bill, then it will script for a new mutiny in the State," he warned.

Kodagu Zilla Panchayat member V P Shashidhar said, "In Nagaland, people consume dog meat. No government has the right to take away right for food. BJP government is carrying out dictatorship."

Communist Party of India (Marxist) District Secretary Dr I R Durgaprasad said "BJP government is introducing the Bill to give mental and physical torture to Muslims. The Bill will put farmers to hardship."

Muslim Pragathipara Chintakara Vedike President K M Kunhi Abdulla said "by implementing the Bill, government is planning to make backward, minorities and farmers as its slaves."

Protest against cow-slaughter attracts people in huge numbers
- Times of India
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mangalore/Protest-against-cow-slaughter-attracts-people-in-huge-numbers/articleshow/6034226.cms 
The former MLC and Congress leader A K Subbaiah, who inaugurated the rally, voiced his opinion saying that this bill was just a move by the State government to appease the priestly class. This is also done with an intention to rob the Muslims of their livelihood, he alleged. In Karnataka, only Muslims are involved in beef trade and if cow slaughtering is completely banned, it will affect the economic condition of many of the Muslims, he contended.

Subbaiah observed that the State Government also does not realize how detrimental this move will be for farmers, who do not have the wherewithal to take care of cows that will not help them in their occupation.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill criticised
- The Hindu
Government cannot dictate terms on food habits of people
Describing the Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter and Preservation of Cattle Bill introduced by the Bharatiya Janata Party government as an attack on the food habits of the people, general secretary of the Karnataka Rajya Raitha Sangha Veera Sangaiah said on Saturday that the implementation of this law would destroy agriculture in the State.

He was speaking at a protest meeting organised by various organisation under the banner of Januvaru Hatya Nishedha Masude Virodhi Okkoota in front of the Deputy Commissioner's office in Udupi.

Mr. Sangaiah said that as per the Bill, farmers would have to leave their old or injured cattle at 'goshalas' and pay for their upkeep every month.


Farmers in the State were committing suicide because they were unable to repay loans.

It would be difficult for them to pay for the upkeep of these cattle. Under the Bill, it was a crime to kill the cattle. The Government had forgotten that a large number of people consumed beef, Mr. Sangaiah said. State convener of the Karnataka Rajya Dalit Sangharsh Samiti N. Venkatesh said that the Government could not dictate terms on the food habits of the people.

The former MLC, L. Hanumanthaiah, said, farmers who work in the fields with cattle had not demanded any law to ban cow slaughter.

Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill is unconstitutional -
Deccan Herald
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/59521/anti-cow-slaughter-bill-unconstitutional.html 
The controversial Karnataka Prevention of Slaughter And Preservation Of Cattle Bill 2010 which aims to bring about a blanket ban on slaughter of milch animals and draught cattle is unconstitutional, said former MP Janardhan Poojary.

Addressing a press meet here on Monday, he said the move of the state government has violated four earlier judgements of Supreme Court on cow slaughter. The existing Prevention Of Cow Slaughter And Cattle Preservation Act, 1964 has been repealed to get this Bill accepted in the Assembly.

He said as per the definition of cattle in the proposed Act now includes bull, bullock and buffalo. Slaughter of cattle has been made a non-bailable offence, punishable with imprisonment ranging between one and seven years, which is unconstitutional. The Bill is draconian.

He said "the Bill should not have been allowed to table in the Assembly. The Bill is anti-farmer. Whether Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa will pay for the daily expenses of these aged cattle. The farmer is forced to keep the cattle with himself till it dies, which will be an additional burden on him."

Poojary alleged that Chief Minister has not respected the Supreme Court's judgement. We have given power to a person who does not value the judgement of the Supreme Court, he observed.  He feared that the Bill can be misused by people to take personal revenge. "CM will learn a lesson when the Bill is misused against him. The Bill was directly targeting minorities and Dalits," he alleged. The Bill was nothing but an agenda of the RSS and Sangh Parivar.

He urged the Chief Minister to withdraw the draconian Bill and continue with the existing Act of 1964.  He challenged CM to issue a statement that he (CM) is ready to violate the verdicts of Supreme Court and get the Bill implemented in the State.

Anti-cow slaughter Bill tabled in Council The Hindu Friday July 09 2010
http://www.hindu.com/2010/07/09/stories/2010070951180400.htm
The Opposition members termed the Bill as "anti-farmer" and "anti-poor." Leader of the Opposition Motamma remarked: "Let the people of the State know that you have more love towards cattle than people."

Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill infringes on rights - Deccan Herald
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/63209/anti-cow-slaughter-bill-infringes.html


Transparency International (Karnataka) Chairman Justice Saldanha termed the Anti-Cow Slaughter Bill as something infringed upon the basic fundamental rights of people as guaranteed in the constitution.

He was speaking at a seminar at the St Marks Cathedral on Saturday. "The Bill is highly discriminatory as it targeted food habits of the most vulnerable and the weaker sections and minorities," he said.

Things could take a dangerous turn as the Bill empowered the police to barge inside any house on the slightest suspicion of possessing cattle. "With the power wielded by the police, it can prove disastrous as the onus of proving the innocence is on the accused," he noted.

Echoing similar views, former MLA, Sriram Reddy said the more than 25 per cent population depended on the milk business to eak out a living. "Most of the cows that give milk last four to five years. With the government making it illegal to sell cows, the onus of maintenance will completely shift to the poor farmers and agriculturist. It would be a big burden on them", he added.

Slaughter Bill: Governor raps government
Deccan Chronicle Jun 20 2010
http://www.deccanchronicle.com/bengaluru/slaughter-bill-governor-raps-government-893 
There seems to be no end to the cold war between Governor HR Bhardwaj and the BJP government in the state. Mr Bhardwaj on Saturday snubbed the government yet again on the controversial anti-cow slaughter Bill and expressed his reservations over the proposed bill, which was passed by the Assembly in March this year. The Bill has to be sent to Raj Bhavan for final ratification.

Lashing out at the Yeddyurappa government for spreading rumours that he had okayed the Bill, Mr Bhardwaj alleged that the news was fabricated. "In fact, I have my own reservations about the Bill. Personally, I am not happy with it. The Bill is still with the Upper House. I will look into it when it reaches me," he said. The Governor said that he was upset with animal husbandry minister Revunaik Belamagi, who used the media for spreading 'fabricated news.' "The priority will be to maintain communal harmony in the state," he said.

The Bill bans slaughter of cattle and sale and use of beef. The offence is punishable with imprisonment not less than one year.
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This petition's been addressed to the Hon'ble Supreme Court, President, Prime Minister or PM, National Human Rights Commission or NHRC, Karnataka State Human Rights Commission or SHRC, National Commission for Minorities or NCM, Karnataka Governor/Guv, Karnataka Chief Minister or CM & Union Law Ministry.

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