Ban Horse Racing and Horse jumping,ban all Horse competitions from the Olympic Games

  • by: Christiane Henker
  • recipient: info@acnolympic.org,info@ocasia.org,fei@fei.org,office@dosb.de

Horses are not Entertainers. They are used in competitive sports including, but not limited to, dressage, endurance riding, eventing, reining, show jumping, tent pegging, vaulting, polo, horse racing, driving, and rodeo.

Equestrian Eventing: The Olympics' Most Dangerous Sport:
he cross country course design has become too challenging," says Dene Stanstall, the horse consultant for U.K. non-profit Animal Aid. "They risk breaking the horses' necks or backs. "Stanstall says a more direct focus on horse safety is needed. 'There is a moral question here. Is it sport to put horses lives in danger?

Organized welfare groups
criticised some horse sports with claims of animal cruelty.

 

Breeding
For years, horses have been bred to run fast. As a result, thoroughbreds have oversized frames and undersized legs. They are so fragile that injuries are commonplace. Furthermore, inbreeding causes genetic defects among racehorses.

Drugs 
Horses are often made dependent on the drugs that their veterinarians and trainers provide. While the drugs may relieve symptoms such as bleeding and pain, they do not treat the underlying problems. Instead, they are used to keep horses who are too injured to race on the track. Legal drugs are also used to mask the presence of illegal drugs injected into the horse. 

Frequently Administered Drugs

  • Lasix  
  • Bute 
  • Steroids 

Injuries
Horses are frequently made to race at the age of two. Since their bones have not fully developed at that point, injuries are common. In addition, many are raced so often that their joints and bones deteriorate. Steeple chasing is designed to make horses fall; this sometimes results in death or serious injury for which the animal is euthanized. 

Common Injuries

  • Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage, i.e. blood in the horse's lungs and windpipe 
  • Lameness 
  • Knee fractures 
  • Ligament sprains 
  • Joint sprains 
  • Shin soreness 
  • Hairline fractures 

Transportation to Slaughter
Horses are placed in double-decker trucks which are too low for them to even stand up straight. They are not given food or water, or even allowed to stop and rest. "Owners" do not want to spend money on painkillers so those animals with a broken leg or other injury must suffer the entire trip without any anesthetic. Since horses must be alive when they arrive at the slaughterhouse in order to be used for human consumption, even animals in excruciating pain will not be euthanized. 

Regulations
Horseracing is effectively excluded from all anti-cruelty laws. Individual states are supposed to be regulating the industry through their own racing commissions. Since the racing commission is a state agency, state prosecutors are disinclined toward pursuing cruelty cases against it. Moreover, because each state receives revenue from its tracks, states are unlikely to hold industry insiders to very strict standards. 

After Racing, horses are often

  • Killed for human consumption overseas 
  • Made into dog food 
  • Used to produce glue 
  • Murdered by their "owners" who then file fraudulent insurance claims. 

You Can Help

  • Do not patronize racetracks 
  • Distribute anti-horseracing information outside of racetracks 
  • Lobby against the construction of new racetracks 
  • Educate others about the cruelty involved in horseracing

 

We urge the International Olympic Commitee to ban all Horse competitions from the Olympic Games.
We urge the Governments to  ban all Horse racings.



Dear Ladies and Gentlemen,

Horses are not Entertainers. They are used in competitive sports including, but not limited to, dressage, endurance riding, eventing, reining, show jumping, tent pegging, vaulting, polo, horse racing, driving, and rodeo.


Equestrian Eventing: The Olympics’ Most Dangerous Sport:
he cross country course design has become too challenging,” says Dene Stanstall, the horse consultant for U.K. non-profit Animal Aid. “They risk breaking the horses’ necks or backs. "Stanstall says a more direct focus on horse safety is needed. 'There is a moral question here. Is it sport to put horses lives in danger?

Organized welfare groups
criticised some horse sports with claims of animal cruelty.


Horses begin training or are already racing when their skeletal systems are still growing and are unprepared to handle the pressures of running on a hard track at high speeds.5 Improved medical treatment and technological advancements have done little to remedy the plight of the racehorse. Between 700 and 800 racehorses are injured and die every year, with a national average of about two breakdowns for every 1,000 starts. Strained tendons or hairline fractures can be tough for veterinarians to diagnose, and the damage may go from minor to irreversible at the next race or workout. Horses do not handle surgery well, as they tend to be disoriented when coming out of anesthesia, and they may fight casts or slings, possibly causing further injury. Many are euthanized in order to save the owners further veterinary fees and other expenses for horses who will never race again.
I urge you to ban all Horse racing and olympic horse disciplines.

Sincerely,









Horses are not Entertainers. They are used in competitive sports including, but not limited to, dressage, endurance riding, eventing, reining, show jumping, tent pegging, vaulting, polo, horse racing, driving, and rodeo.








Equestrian Eventing: The Olympics’ Most Dangerous Sport:
he cross country course design has become too challenging,” says Dene Stanstall, the horse consultant for U.K. non-profit Animal Aid. “They risk breaking the horses’ necks or backs. "Stanstall says a more direct focus on horse safety is needed. 'There is a moral question here. Is it sport to put horses lives in danger?








Organized welfare groups
criticised some horse sports with claims of animal cruelty.








Horse racing is a popular equestrian sport which is practiced in many nations around the world. It is inextricably associated with gambling, where in certain events, stakes can become very high. Despite its illegality in most competitions, these conditions of extreme competitiveness can lead to the use of performing-enhancing drugs and extreme training techniques, which can result in negative side effects for the horses' well-being. The races themselves have also proved dangerous to the horses – especially steeplechasing, which requires the horse to jump hurdles whilst galloping at full speed. This can result in injury or death to the horse, as well as the jockey. A study by animal welfare group Animal Aid revealed that approximately 375 racehorses die yearly, with 30% of these either during or as a result of injuries from a race. The report also highlighted the increasing frequency of race-related illnesses, including bleeding lungs (exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage) and gastric ulcers.








Animal rights groups are also primarily concerned that certain sports or training exercises may cause unnecessary pain or injuries to horse athletes. Some specific training or showing practices are so widely condemned that they have been made illegal at the national level and violations can incur criminal penalties. The most well-known is soring, a practice of applying a caustic ointment just above the hooves of a Tennessee Walking Horse to make it pick up its feet higher. However, in spite of a federal law in the United States prohibiting this practice and routine inspections of horse shows by inspectors from the United States Department of Agriculture, soring is still widespread and difficult to eliminate. Some events themselves are also considered so abusive that they are banned in many countries. Among these are horse-tripping, a sport where riders chase and rope a loose-running horse by its front legs, throwing it to the ground.








Secondary effects of racing have also recently been uncovered. A 2006 investigation by The Observer in the UK found that each year 6,000–10,000 horses are slaughtered for consumption abroad, a significant proportion of which are horses bred for racing. A boom in the number of foals bred has meant that there is not adequate resources to care for unwanted horses. Demand has increased for this massive breeding programme to be scaled back. Despite over 1000 foals being produced annually by the industry, 66% of those bred for such a purpose were never entered into a race, and despite a life expectancy of 30 years, many are killed before their fifth birthday.








We urge the International Olympic Commitee to ban all Horse competitions from the Olympic Games.
We urge the Governments to stop using Horses for Entertainment and Sports.








Sincerely,



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