Is Killing Wolves Against Native Tribal Rights? Wolves Should Be Protected By Tribal Rights!

  • by: SavingAmericasWolves
  • recipient: President Obama, Ken Salazar(feedback@ios.doi.gov), Bureau of Indian Affairs,@indianaffairs.gov, US Congress, US House Of Rep's,jvanegeren@madison.com
On July 17, in a conference room at a Holiday Inn in Stevens Point, Ojibwe tribal elder Joe Rose stood before the state Natural Resources Board at a hearing about the Wisconsin's inaugural wolf hunting season to tell a story.

Read more: http://host.madison.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/capitol-report/brother-wolf-native-americans-say-upcoming-wolf-hunt-is-premature/article_8e8f8bf6-fc61-11e1-94aa-001a4bcf887a.html#ixzz26QpnOBjP

 

Bringing up the point,the WOLF has been considered not only a symbol,a brother, a family member, a religious totem, but many things to the natives. So is it actually Legally Anyones Right to Kill Them? You are KILLING ONE OF THIER FREEDOM SYMBOLS! 

  http://www.ehow.com/info_8625863_indian-legends-wolf.html

 

Importance of the wolf in Native American culture 

Native American cultures, the First People of America and Canada, have held the wolf in high regard for centuries. It is because of this respect for the animal that the wolf and symbols for the wolf appeared in the art, mythology and religion of many Native American cultures. Indeed, so strong was their respect for this beautiful and powerful animal, some 

tribesof the North American continent compared themselves to wolves both in the characteristics of wolves and the lifestyle of a wolf pack and were called Wolf People by other tribes' 
In legends, the wolf is often seen as a god or a spiritual entity.

 

THE OJIBWA ALSO CALLED CHIPPEWA 

Timber wolves played a big part in the ecosystem and delicate balance of the land and the Native Americans recognized that role. Many Native Americans credit the wolves in teaching them about the importance of family and how to hunt and forage for food. In other words, they were credited with the livelihood of the tribe. Other tribes believed that the timber wolves were spiritual beings that could impart magical powers.

Native Americans have often held timber wolves in the highest esteem in their culture. In truth, they are many times seen as a sacred animal and featured significantly in ancient songs, dances and stories that have been handed down for generations. Their role in Native American life was a given and often revered and welcomed.

Blackfoot

According to the legend, a wolf accompanied the ancestor of the Blackfoot tribe, a man named Napioa. In another story, wolves save a man from a trap set by the man's two evil wives. After taking him back to live with their pack, an old wolf in a cave uses magic to transform the man into a wolf-man. While retaining the body of a normal human, his hands and feet became like the paws of a wolf

Shoshone

Like the Pawnee tribe, the Shoshone people believed that the wolf was the initial cause or instigator of death on earth. According to their mythology, the wolf and the coyote got into a fight about the rebirth of humans, with coyote claiming that over-population of humans would result if the dead were brought back to life. Wolf agreed with Coyote and caused the first human to die to be the son of Coyote. Coyote begged wolf to bring back his son, but was reminded by wolf that Coyote was the one who originally argued in favor of death.

Quileute

The Quileute are a tribe of Native Americans from Washington state who believe their people descended from wolves. Q'waeti' or Q'wati was a god or spirit with a magical ability to transform animals and people. According to the story, Q'waeti came upon two wolves and turned them into the first two Quileute Indians. Q'waeti instructed the two new humans in the traditions their tribe was to practice, and became the spiritual protector of the Queleute people.

Inuit

According to an article published in "Arctic Anthropology" in 1998 by the University of Wisconsin, the wolf is a symbol of protection to the Inuit people, who believed that the wolf was a benevolent creature who defended humans against evil spirits. One Inuit legend tells of the woman, Qisaruatsiaq, who transformed into a wolf after years of living and fishing on her own. Other tales tell of Ijiraat, or shape-shifters, who transform into a variety of animals, including wolves, so as to fool and kill lone travelers.

http://www.helium.com/items/1707340-native-americans-and-wolves

The People of the First Nationshunted to procure food for their families and the entire tribe just as wolves did for the entire pack. They did not compete with each other for food and did not kill for pleasure. Neither did Native American hunters or wolveskill more than they needed for survival. Native American hunters would strive to imitate the wolf when hunting. Both were stealthy and patient when hunting and both had the staminato stay with a hunt until successful. It was considered the highest praise for the prowess of a hunter to be compared to a wolf. 

Both the wolf and Native Americans were fierce defenders of their pack or tribe. Just as wolves did, Native Americans would fight to the death to defend their territory in order to preserve their way of life because it meant their very survival, yet neither are naturally aggressive and prefer to be social. If the food became scarce in their territory, the People of the First Nations would move the entire tribe to another territory which was common for wolf packs to do. However, over the past two centuries on the North American continent, wolf packs and the First Nations have been relegated to specified territories. 

The wolf was also a magicalanimal in the religions of the First Nations. It is a symbol of freedom and individuality, yet attentive to the responsibilities of the pack. Many Native American tribes would use an image of the wolf in their totems or amulets. Religious beliefs of some tribes attribute the creation of the earth in part to the wolf. Other tribes believed that if they were to kill a wolf that severe retribution would be brought down upon the perpetrators. However, other tribes believed that the power of the skin of a wolf would help them be more successful in the hunt, bring a chief’s dead son to life or alleviate the pain of childbirth. 

Throughout the different cultures of Native Americans, The First People embraced the wolf in their culture and it was said that “The wolf and the Indian once lived in harmony…they hunted together and their spirits touched.”    

    In Conclusion, Anyone Participating in Killing Of Wolves is in Direct Violation of Harming Native Tribal Religious and Freedom Symbols and Rights. Stops These Killings, Its not harvesting, or managing vermin, it's Murder in some eyes!

On July 17, in a conference room at a Holiday Inn in Stevens Point, Ojibwe tribal elder Joe Rose stood before the state Natural Resources Board at a hearing about the Wisconsin's inaugural wolf hunting season to tell a story.
































































Read more: http://host.madison.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/capitol-report/brother-wolf-native-americans-say-upcoming-wolf-hunt-is-premature/article_8e8f8bf6-fc61-11e1-94aa-001a4bcf887a.html#ixzz26QpnOBjP
































 
































Bringing up the point,the WOLF has been considered not only a symbol,a brother, a family member, a religious totem, but many things to the natives. So is it actually Legally Anyones Right to Kill Them? You are KILLING ONE OF THIER FREEDOM SYMBOLS! 
































































  http://www.ehow.com/info_8625863_indian-legends-wolf.html
































 
































































Importance of the wolf in Native American culture 
































































































































Native American cultures, the First People of America and Canada, have held the wolf in high regard for centuries. It is because of this respect for the animal that the wolf and symbols for the wolf appeared in the art, mythology and religion of many Native American cultures. Indeed, so strong was their respect for this beautiful and powerful animal, some 
































































tribesof the North American continent compared themselves to wolves both in the characteristics of wolves and the lifestyle of a wolf pack and were called Wolf People by other tribes' 
In legends, the wolf is often seen as a god or a spiritual entity.
















 
















THE OJIBWA ALSO CALLED CHIPPEWA 
















Timber wolves played a big part in the ecosystem and delicate balance of the land and the Native Americans recognized that role. Many Native Americans credit the wolves in teaching them about the importance of family and how to hunt and forage for food. In other words, they were credited with the livelihood of the tribe. Other tribes believed that the timber wolves were spiritual beings that could impart magical powers.
















Native Americans have often held timber wolves in the highest esteem in their culture. In truth, they are many times seen as a sacred animal and featured significantly in ancient songs, dances and stories that have been handed down for generations. Their role in Native American life was a given and often revered and welcomed.

































Blackfoot

According to the legend, a wolf accompanied the ancestor of the Blackfoot tribe, a man named Napioa. In another story, wolves save a man from a trap set by the man's two evil wives. After taking him back to live with their pack, an old wolf in a cave uses magic to transform the man into a wolf-man. While retaining the body of a normal human, his hands and feet became like the paws of a wolf
































































































Shoshone
















Like the Pawnee tribe, the Shoshone people believed that the wolf was the initial cause or instigator of death on earth. According to their mythology, the wolf and the coyote got into a fight about the rebirth of humans, with coyote claiming that over-population of humans would result if the dead were brought back to life. Wolf agreed with Coyote and caused the first human to die to be the son of Coyote. Coyote begged wolf to bring back his son, but was reminded by wolf that Coyote was the one who originally argued in favor of death.

































































































Quileute
















The Quileute are a tribe of Native Americans from Washington state who believe their people descended from wolves. Q'waeti' or Q'wati was a god or spirit with a magical ability to transform animals and people. According to the story, Q'waeti came upon two wolves and turned them into the first two Quileute Indians. Q'waeti instructed the two new humans in the traditions their tribe was to practice, and became the spiritual protector of the Queleute people.

































































































Inuit
















According to an article published in "Arctic Anthropology" in 1998 by the University of Wisconsin, the wolf is a symbol of protection to the Inuit people, who believed that the wolf was a benevolent creature who defended humans against evil spirits. One Inuit legend tells of the woman, Qisaruatsiaq, who transformed into a wolf after years of living and fishing on her own. Other tales tell of Ijiraat, or shape-shifters, who transform into a variety of animals, including wolves, so as to fool and kill lone travelers.

































































































http://www.helium.com/items/1707340-native-americans-and-wolves
















The People of the First Nationshunted to procure food for their families and the entire tribe just as wolves did for the entire pack. They did not compete with each other for food and did not kill for pleasure. Neither did Native American hunters or wolveskill more than they needed for survival. Native American hunters would strive to imitate the wolf when hunting. Both were stealthy and patient when hunting and both had the staminato stay with a hunt until successful. It was considered the highest praise for the prowess of a hunter to be compared to a wolf. 

















Both the wolf and Native Americans were fierce defenders of their pack or tribe. Just as wolves did, Native Americans would fight to the death to defend their territory in order to preserve their way of life because it meant their very survival, yet neither are naturally aggressive and prefer to be social. If the food became scarce in their territory, the People of the First Nations would move the entire tribe to another territory which was common for wolf packs to do. However, over the past two centuries on the North American continent, wolf packs and the First Nations have been relegated to specified territories. 

































The wolf was also a magicalanimal in the religions of the First Nations. It is a symbol of freedom and individuality, yet attentive to the responsibilities of the pack. Many Native American tribes would use an image of the wolf in their totems or amulets. Religious beliefs of some tribes attribute the creation of the earth in part to the wolf. Other tribes believed that if they were to kill a wolf that severe retribution would be brought down upon the perpetrators. However, other tribes believed that the power of the skin of a wolf would help them be more successful in the hunt, bring a chief’s dead son to life or alleviate the pain of childbirth. 
































Throughout the different cultures of Native Americans, The First People embraced the wolf in their culture and it was said that “The wolf and the Indian once lived in harmony…they hunted together and their spirits touched.”    
































    In Conclusion, Anyone Participating in Killing Of Wolves is in Direct Violation of Harming Native Tribal Religious and Freedom Symbols and Rights. Stops These Killings, Its not harvesting, or managing vermin, it's Murder in some eyes!
















































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