Demand AVMA stop mutilating our pets

Dear Robert Ross representative Of Missouri
My name is __. I am contacting you to seek assistance with introducing a bill to ban the declawing of cats and kittens in America along with cosmetic procedures  tail docking, ear cropping & de-barking. All these surgeries are cosmetic,have no health benefits to the animal and can result in death.
I have collected thousands of petition signatures in support of the banning of declawing in America. We need the help of Robert Ross representative Of Missouri to take this to the next level.
With the help of signatures, the petition, and I ( name) But I am only one voice; we need representatives to help introduce a bill that will ban this procedure in all of America.
Declawing is banned in over 30 countries, in Israel there is a $20,000 fine for declawing a cat. In England & Australia declawing has never been introduced into veterinary medicine. 99% of American's Cat Rescues/Shelters have a no declaw policy. Over 100 veterinary clinics in America have abandoned the practice of declawing and each day the numbers are growing.
The America Veterinary Medical Association does not support declawing or cosmetic procedures tail docking, ear cropping, debarking, but encourage Veterinary hopitals and clinics to do the surgeries for profect and test medicines on patience. The American Medical Association does not recommend declawing for those who have diabetes or auto
immune disease.
Declawing is the amputation of each front toe bone at the first joint (hind foot declaw surgery is not commonly performed). This is equivalent to a person losing the entire tip of every finger at the first knuckle. The cat loses 1/3 of its paws. The surgery is so excruciatingly painful that it is used to test the effectiveness of pain medications. Initial recovery takes a few weeks, but even after the surgical wounds have healed, there are often other long-term physical and psychological effects.
What are the potential complications of declawing?
Pain. While the immediate post-surgical pain that the cats suffer is obviously severe, it is impossible to know how much chronic pain and suffering declawing causes. Cats typically conceal pain or illness until it becomes unbearable. With moderate chronic pain, it may be that they simply learn to live with it. However, a new syndrome of “Chronic Pain of Onychectomy” has been documented to affect many cats, sometimes months or years after declawing.
Post-surgical complications.Lameness, abscesses, and regrowth of the claw can occur after surgery. In one report that studied cats for only five months after surgery, more than 30% of cats developed complications from both declaw and tenectomy surgeries (digital tenectomy or tendonectomy is a procedure, sometimes promoted as an “alternative” to declaw, where the tendons that extend the toes are cut. The claws still require frequent trimming. The procedure is not recommended.). Nail regrowth has been known to occur up to 15 years after surgery; and the process of regrowth is painful as it occurs.
Joint Stiffness. In declawed (and tenectomized) cats, the tendons that control the toe joints retract after the surgery, and over time these joints become essentially “frozen.” The toes can no longer be extended, but remain fully contracted for the lifetime of the cat. The fact that most cats continue to “scratch” after they are declawed is often said to “prove” that the cat does not “miss” its claws. However, this is as easily explained as the cat’s desperate desire to stretch those stiff, contracted paw, leg, shoulder and spinal joints.
Arthritis. Researchers have shown that, in the immediate post-operative period, newly declawed cats shift their body weight backward onto the large central pad of the front feet and off the toes. This effect was significant even when strong pain medication was given, and remained apparent for the duration of the study (up to 40 hours after surgery). If this altered gait persists over time, it would cause stress on the leg joints and spine, and could lead to damage and arthritic changes in multiple joints.
Litterbox problems. Many experts say that declawed cats have more litter box avoidance problems than clawed cats. If cat owners knew they could end up trading scratched furniture for urine-soaked carpeting, they might have second thoughts about declawing. Studies suggest that up to 15% of cats will develop litterbox avoidance behaviors after declawing.
Biting. Deprived of claws, a cat may turn to its only other line of defense—its teeth. Some experts believe that naturally aggressive cats that are declawed are the most likely to become biters. Studies have shown that up to 18% of declawed cats either start biting or bite harder and more often after declaw surgery.
Death. There is always a small but real risk of death from any general anesthesia, as well as from hemorrhage or other surgical complications. Declawing that results in biting or litterbox avoidance may result in the cat being dumped at a shelter. Such behaviors make them unadoptable, and they will be destroyed. Many cats are abandoned or exiled to a life.
outdoors because of these unwanted behaviors, even though declawed cats should not be allowed outside—their ability to defend themselves, and to escape danger by climbing, is seriously impaired. It’s a horrible truth that today, a friendly, declawed cat makes ideal bait for training fighting dogs to kill. Mine seek out all the time because watch and learn when and how to seek by their pet parents/owners.
If you are interested in supporting the bill, please contact
Name
address
contact information
Thank you for taking the time to read to my concerns on American animal welfare. I hope we can help end animal cruelty in America one step at a time.
                                                                                                      Regard (Name)
               
 



Dear Robert Ross representative Of Missouri


My name is __. I am contacting you to seek assistance with introducing a bill to ban the declawing of cats and kittens in America along with cosmetic procedures  tail docking, ear cropping & de-barking. All these surgeries are cosmetic,have no health benefits to the animal and can result in death.


I have collected thousands of petition signatures in support of the banning of declawing in America. We need the help of Robert Ross representative Of Missouri to take this to the next level.


With the help of signatures, the petition, and I ( name) But I am only one voice; we need representatives to help introduce a bill that will ban this procedure in all of America.



Declawing is banned in over 30 countries, in Israel there is a $20,000 fine for declawing a cat. In England & Australia declawing has never been introduced into veterinary medicine. 99% of American's Cat Rescues/Shelters have a no declaw policy. Over 100 veterinary clinics in America have abandoned the practice of declawing and each day the numbers are growing.


The America Veterinary Medical Association does not support declawing or cosmetic procedures tail docking, ear cropping, debarking, but encourage Veterinary hopitals and clinics to do the surgeries for profect and test medicines on patience. The American Medical Association does not recommend declawing for those who have diabetes or auto

immune disease.


Declawing is the amputation of each front toe bone at the first joint (hind foot declaw surgery is not commonly performed). This is equivalent to a person losing the entire tip of every finger at the first knuckle. The cat loses 1/3 of its paws. The surgery is so excruciatingly painful that it is used to test the effectiveness of pain medications. Initial recovery takes a few weeks, but even after the surgical wounds have healed, there are often other long-term physical and psychological effects.


What are the potential complications of declawing?

Pain. While the immediate post-surgical pain that the cats suffer is obviously severe, it is impossible to know how much chronic pain and suffering declawing causes. Cats typically conceal pain or illness until it becomes unbearable. With moderate chronic pain, it may be that they simply learn to live with it. However, a new syndrome of “Chronic Pain of Onychectomy” has been documented to affect many cats, sometimes months or years after declawing.


Post-surgical complications.Lameness, abscesses, and regrowth of the claw can occur after surgery. In one report that studied cats for only five months after surgery, more than 30% of cats developed complications from both declaw and tenectomy surgeries (digital tenectomy or tendonectomy is a procedure, sometimes promoted as an “alternative” to declaw, where the tendons that extend the toes are cut. The claws still require frequent trimming. The procedure is not recommended.). Nail regrowth has been known to occur up to 15 years after surgery; and the process of regrowth is painful as it occurs.


Joint Stiffness. In declawed (and tenectomized) cats, the tendons that control the toe joints retract after the surgery, and over time these joints become essentially “frozen.” The toes can no longer be extended, but remain fully contracted for the lifetime of the cat. The fact that most cats continue to “scratch” after they are declawed is often said to “prove” that the cat does not “miss” its claws. However, this is as easily explained as the cat’s desperate desire to stretch those stiff, contracted paw, leg, shoulder and spinal joints.


Arthritis. Researchers have shown that, in the immediate post-operative period, newly declawed cats shift their body weight backward onto the large central pad of the front feet and off the toes. This effect was significant even when strong pain medication was given, and remained apparent for the duration of the study (up to 40 hours after surgery). If this altered gait persists over time, it would cause stress on the leg joints and spine, and could lead to damage and arthritic changes in multiple joints.


Litterbox problems. Many experts say that declawed cats have more litter box avoidance problems than clawed cats. If cat owners knew they could end up trading scratched furniture for urine-soaked carpeting, they might have second thoughts about declawing. Studies suggest that up to 15% of cats will develop litterbox avoidance behaviors after declawing.


Biting. Deprived of claws, a cat may turn to its only other line of defense—its teeth. Some experts believe that naturally aggressive cats that are declawed are the most likely to become biters. Studies have shown that up to 18% of declawed cats either start biting or bite harder and more often after declaw surgery.


Death. There is always a small but real risk of death from any general anesthesia, as well as from hemorrhage or other surgical complications. Declawing that results in biting or litterbox avoidance may result in the cat being dumped at a shelter. Such behaviors make them unadoptable, and they will be destroyed. Many cats are abandoned or exiled to a life.


outdoors because of these unwanted behaviors, even though declawed cats should not be allowed outside—their ability to defend themselves, and to escape danger by climbing, is seriously impaired. It’s a horrible truth that today, a friendly, declawed cat makes ideal bait for training fighting dogs to kill. Mine seek out all the time because watch and learn when and how to seek by their pet parents/owners.


If you are interested in supporting the bill, please con


Thank you for taking the time to read to my concerns on American animal welfare. I hope we can help end animal cruelty in America one step at a time.

Update #53 years ago
Use the example letter in this petition. Send the letter under family and friends name. Also ask social media groups to write themselves. Keep writing monthly. This will keep us in mind. Thank you all for supporting this cause. Bless you. :)) Here is address to write: Headquarters of AVMA
1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360
Phone: 800.248.2862
Fax: 847.925.1329
Update #43 years ago
Vote to ban declaw here:http://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw/index.ssf/2015/10/cat_declaw_debate_rages_on_aft.html#incart_story_package Thank you every one for caring and sharing. I love you all!
Update #34 years ago
If we can get the petition to 6,000 , i can send it to the senates. Thanks again everybody.
Update #24 years ago
5,000 plus signers !!!! Woo hoo!!!! Thank you every body who signed . Lets keep sharing . If you like, join google community group : Ban Toe Amputation for cats sake at: https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/105353126946040990134 to sign more petition on toe amputation. Also make flyers to educate the public. You can copy and past this petition on a flyer to send more people to sign or copy and past the website above so they can sign more then one petition. Again thank you so much!!
Update #14 years ago
Wow ! 1,000 plus signers in one day. Whoo hoo!! But sadly most are from over seas. Well, keep sharing and join the community on google https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/105353126946040990134 to educate the public . Thanks
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