Break the Trusts!

After the war, our country was considered to be in the 'golden age of capitalism.' While there are several reasons for this, one of the most prominent was the collection of Anti-Trust laws present.

What it did was that if a corporation ever got too big, the executive branch would break up the assets and shares of the company so that a monopolies would not overtake the market and limit competition.

The law brought a heavy flow of competition, creating a healthy abundance of small businesses and entrepreneurship. The result was that:

-Workers weren't forced to a select few corporations for work, so businesses offered higher wages and better conditions to incentivize workers to apply. As a result, most every business offered higher wages in ratio to today, giving the consumer more purchasing power.

-Businesses received more money from the strengthened consumer power, whilst not being crushed by monopolies.

-Seeing that there is more competition, companies have more incentives to be more creative with their products.

Note, more Americans were in a more stable economic situation today due to these laws. They disappeared after the Reagan administration, creating the current economic situation/inequality.

Do not forget, the current economic situation is very similar to the economy of the 1800's, which had an influx of Monopolies who limited competition, stemmed corruption, (lobbyism in today's time) and forced many workers to strike due to the conditions of the time. Is the economy of the 1800's and today the exact same? No. It is scarily similar, that is all.

I would request my fellow Americans to sign the petition to bring it to attention before the people or congress.

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