Tell Congress: Support the Younger-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Act

Currently, only Americans over the age of 60 are eligible for support programs through the Older Americans Act (OAA). But Alzheimer's is not just a disease of old age. Many people with younger-onset (also known as early-onset) are in their 40s or 50s. In the United States, it is estimated that approximately 200,000 people have younger-onset Alzheimer's disease.

Individuals living with younger-onset Alzheimer's  face unique challenges when it comes to family, work and finances. They may be parenting young children at home, or still be working as the primary income provider for their family. And due to their young age, they may have more trouble receiving an accurate diagnosis — a diagnosis that even family and friends may question.

"Whether someone is older than 60 or younger than 60 when he or she is diagnosed with Alzheimer's, the progression of this terrible disease is the same."

-Sen. Collins, a founder and co-chair of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease

The Younger-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Act (S.901/H.R.1903) would allow individuals living with younger-onset Alzheimer's disease to access support and services from programs under the OAA. Those programs include nutritional services, supportive services and respite care through the National Family Caregiver Support program.  

Take action today to support all those facing Alzheimer's, no matter their age. 

Dear Member of Congress: 

The Younger-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Act (S.901/H.R.1903) would allow individuals diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer's disease under 60 years of age to be eligible to access supports and services under the Older Americans Act.


Currently, only Americans over the age of 60 are eligible for programs through the Older Americans Act. Individuals living with younger-onset face unique challenges when it comes to family, work and finances. They may be parenting young children at home, or still be working as the primary income provider for their family.

Due to their young age, they may have more trouble receiving an accurate diagnosis, and even family and friends might question their diagnosis. The stigma associated with younger-onset Alzheimer's can have a significant impact on their well-being and quality of life.

[Your comment here]

Sincerely,

[Your name here]

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